The Benefits of a Bleisure Vacation

July 11, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Bleisure — a portmanteau of “business” and “leisure” — is an excellent way for families to take small vacations, or for overworked business travelers to relax for a day before jumping back into the swing of work. And if you’re a frequent traveler who visits all kinds of cities but never actually gets to see anything, like I was for several years, it’s a great way to see a new city without the added travel costs.

Essentially, a bleisure trip just means tacking an extra day or two onto the beginning or end of a business trip. For example, if you’re traveling to Orlando for a conference, you can pad your schedule by a couple extra days, book your plane ticket according to the new schedule, and then play to your heart’s content for those two extra days.

You’ll need to pay for those extra hotel nights yourself, as well as any expenses — meals, events, car rental, admission tickets — but otherwise, you’re already there, so treat yourself to a day or two in a new city.

Photo of a laptop on a beach. This would be a great way to spend a bleisure trip.The nice thing about a bleisure trip is you’re already paying for a plane ticket or driving to that city. There’s no need to pay for transportation to return to the city a different time.

Plus, your schedule may afford you some of that extra time already. It’s very rare for a business conference or trade show to run over the weekend, and most of them end on a Friday, if not a Thursday afternoon. Nearly all the conferences I have ever attended tried to get you home on a Friday, so it should be easy to extend your stay to Sunday; no one is expecting you at the office on Saturday morning.

Also, extending your stay can sometimes lower your airfare significantly. The two cheapest days to fly on are Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and the next two are Thursday and Saturday. And the most expensive are Sundays and Fridays.

The reason for this is because most business travelers prefer to fly on Mondays and Fridays, and most vacationers prefer to return home on Sundays.

So if you had a conference that ran on a Thursday, and Friday, you could book a Tuesday – Saturday flight, and get a much cheaper ticket. (I would even try to get a very early flight on Tuesday and a very late flight on Saturday.)

In some cases, this could even save enough money to get the company to pay for an extra hotel night. I remember once that a plane ticket cost $300 less if I flew home one day later. My hotel was only $120 for the night, so I stayed the extra day.

Being on a bleisure trip can also give you some extra time with your family, especially if you’re a frequent traveler, like I was. Fifteen years ago, I was going to attend a conference in Orlando, and I decided to tack on a 5-day vacation.

The company paid for my own plane ticket, and I paid for my family’s. We all stayed in the same hotel room, and after the conference was over, we spent a few days at Disney World and flew home the following week.

My wife and kids would hang out at the pool or go shopping while I was at the conference, and they got to enjoy a few extra days in Florida at (almost) no cost. We were responsible for our own meals — I would pay for mine separately on the company card — and we got to spend a few extra days together, avoiding the cold Indiana winter for a few days.

Bleisure travel is becoming popular and important enough that many businesses are encouraging their people to take an extra day or two while they’re traveling. (If you do it right, it won’t even count against your vacation days.) So if you ever have the chance to visit a new city or country while you’re on business, take the chance.

What kinds of bleisure trips have you taken? Do you go by yourself or take your family? What do you like to do when you’re traveling? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Laura Hoffmann (Flickr, Creative Commons)

About 

Erik Deckers is a travel writer, as well as a content marketer and book author. He is the co-author of Branding Yourself, No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine. Erik has been blogging since 1997, and has been a newspaper humor columnist for over 20 years

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