Vacation Like Anthony Bourdain

December 13, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

I’ve been on an Anthony Bourdain kick lately. I’ve always been a fan, back to his Kitchen Confidential days, and like most everyone else, I was shaken when I heard he died. So I’ve been reading and rereading articles about how he liked to travel and experience new places.

A March 2018 article in Time Magazine — 3 Things to Never Do While Traveling, According to Anthony Bourdain — explained how Bourdain liked to encounter new cities and countries, places to go, and places to avoid when you’re looking for some place to spend your vacation.

I’ve always tried to follow some of his travel dictums — like avoiding pre-packaged holiday tours and straying off the beaten path — but this article was a good reminder about what’s good and fun about travel.

So whether you’re taking family out of town for a week, or you’re just looking to tag a day or two to the end of a business trip (also called bleisure travel), here are a few of Anthony Bourdain’s secrets.

The Eiffel Tower - Anthony Bourdain says to skip trying to take a picture from the top. He says it's lethal to your soul.First of all, skip the tourist traps. Travel expert after travel expert will all tell you to skip the most popular sights just to save time and avoid lines. Besides, said Bourdain, traveling to Paris just to stand on the Eiffel Tower is “lethal to your soul” and a selfie in front of the Great Pyramids is “completely overrated.”

Imagine standing in line for four hours just to get to the top of the Eiffel Tower or to see the statue of David. And will you be able to see David all by yourself? No, you’ll be crammed in with a whole crowd of other people all raising their phones, trying to get a photo of the statue that doesn’t have a dozen other phones in front of it. Why? Just to say you saw it? In that six hours, you could visit another museum, go on a walking tour of Rome, or see a symphony or a play. You won’t be able to see it up close, and all you’ll have is a cell phone photo of your memories.

Instead, he would rather walk into a city and see what he can find. There’s something special about the serendipity of new discoveries that makes travel exciting. I like to visit a new city and find the arts neighborhoods, the places where the artists live and do their work, where the local restaurants outnumber the chains, and where the cool stores have avoided the crush of the malls.

Bourdain would land in a city and then just strike out in a direction to see what he could find, and the payoffs were almost always worth the risk.

Second, don’t try to create a schedule of all the places you have to see. Instead, explore and let the city happen to you. Serendipity, remember?

As Bourdain told Time just a few months before he died, “The sort of frenzied compression of time needed to take the tour, to see the sights, keeps you in a bubble that prevents you from having magic happen to you. Nothing unexpected or wonderful is likely to happen if you have an itinerary in Paris filled with the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower.”

Third, stray off the beaten path. Look for the real moments of the city. Just catch a cab to somewhere away from the tourist traps, but still within the regular part of the city. For example, in Indianapolis, if you head just half a mile northeast from the convention center, you’ll find where all the locals like to eat and go to the theater. In Orlando, that area is Mills 50, which is about 15 – 18 miles away from Disney World. In New York City, that means going to Brooklyn, and not Times Square. Or it means instead of going to Paris, going to Brittany and Normandy instead, or even Brussels, Belgium.

For one thing, going to the less-touristy destination means you can stretch your travel dollars. Believe me, visiting Minneapolis costs a lot less than visiting Chicago, and Portland, Oregon has plenty to do and it costs a lot less than San Francisco.

Oh sure, if you’re going for that traditional, city-defining experience — music in Nashville, amusement parks in Orlando, movie stars in Hollywood — then there’s no substitute. Portland will never beat San Francisco.

But if you just want to get away, see some sites, eat some great food, and avoid doing what everyone else does, travel like Anthony Bourdain. Go where other tourists fear to tread, walk into the city and see what you can find, and never, ever fall into the same traps that waste half your day by standing in line.

What kinds of vacations do you like to take? Do you find your own adventure, or do you prefer something that other people have done so you can share the experience? Share your thoughts with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Moonik (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 3.0)

Last updated by at .