11 Secrets to Packing Light On Your Next Trip

February 28, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

A friend recently told me that the last time she and her husband flew somewhere, they packed one big suitcase so they could avoid paying for a second checked bag charge on their airline.

“Didn’t you carry on your bags?” I asked.

“Well, just our personal bags. But we figured we could save some hassle if we just checked our bag.” (They did, but they still paid the fee for it.)

I tend to be a little. . . frugal when it comes to needlessly giving other people my money. I’m not cheap by any means — I’ll happily make frivolous, impulsive purchases, like a latte or a book. But I’ve found that I have less money to spend on those things if I do things like pay to check my suitcases. Especially because I know the ultimate secret to gaming the luggage system.

Pack everything into a carry-on bag!

Okay, it’s not really a secret, but I see so many people packing giant suitcases for relatively short trips that I think a lot of people still don’t know it.

Packing light is really quite simple. You get two carry-on items per passenger: a personal item that fits under your seat (a purse, backpack, or briefcase) and a carry-on suitcase, such as a 21-inch rolling suitcase. In my friend’s case, they could have each taken their own carry-on bag and never checked a bag in the first place.

And yet people will pack a large suitcase per person(!) for a one week vacation, even when they’re going to a place where shorts and t-shirts are suitable. I mean, if you’re traveling to Antarctica, you can be forgiven for packing more than one bulky sweater. But if you’re traveling to a non-winter destination this Spring Break, or are going on a business trip for less than 10 days, you should be able to fit everything into a single rollaboard suitcase. Here’s how you do it.

Packing light in an Atlantic carry-on suitcase

Okay, so we didn’t roll the clothes, but we’re still packing light for this trip.

  1. You don’t need one outfit for every day. Take one pair of pants for every three days and one shirt for every two days of your trip. Make sure you have enough underwear and socks for the entire trip (I usually add one extra pair of each), but you can also do laundry halfway through the trip or at least wash your underwear and socks in the sink.
  2. Pack clothes that go with each other. Don’t take unique outfits. Wear colors that can go together so you can mix and match them and create new outfits. For example, two pairs of pants and three shirts gives you six outfits. That’s better than six pants and shirts.
  3. Roll your clothes, don’t fold them. Folding your clothes can cause wrinkles, but if you roll your pants and shirts carefully, you can prevent wrinkles. Some packing experts also suggest you fold-and-stack your shirts vertically, but you still have the wrinkling problem.
  4. Don’t take “just in case” clothes. My wife and I used to pack a nice outfit “just in case” we ever went to a fancy restaurant. We finally stopped doing that since all the restaurants we went to allowed casual clothes. If we wanted to go to a nice restaurant, we made reservations in advance so we could pack accordingly.
  5. Don’t take basic toiletries. If you’re staying in a hotel, they’ll have things like shampoo, lotion, and toothpaste so leave yours at home. Otherwise, get travel-size toiletries, or better yet, buy your items when you arrive.
  6. Your children also get a carry-on bag. If you’re taking your young children with you, don’t pack their stuff in your bag. Let them be responsible for pulling their own little carry-on behind them. And if they’re too small for that, just remember, if they’re old enough to require a ticket, they get their own bag too, even if they’re too young to actually manage it.
  7. Wear your biggest, heaviest shoes on the plane. They’ll take up a lot of space in your bag, so wear them on the plane instead, and pack your smaller, lighter shoes. And just like your clothes, don’t take shoes for one day; take shoes that can be worn anywhere.
  8. If you think you might work out, you won’t. So don’t take your exercise clothes and shoes if you’re not sure you’ll do it. If exercising isn’t a regular habit yet, this is not the time to start, so don’t waste space with stuff you won’t use.
  9. Buy clothes at your destination. If you’re heading to a place known for its fashion, like France or Italy, don’t take a lot of clothes with you. Take advantage of your surroundings and pick up some trendy fashions at the local shops. That gives you plenty of room in your suitcase, but it also helps you look more like a local.
  10. Ship large and bulky items ahead. My father-in-law and I used to travel to trade shows in other states and even other countries. He always insisted on filling a large suitcase with samples and sales literature and taking it with us. Luckily, this was in the day before you had to pay for a checked bag, so it wasn’t expensive, but it sure was a problem the first time the airline lost our bag. We stopped checking our trade show items and shipped them ahead after that.
  11. Never, ever take your pillow. I know people who pack their pillows because they want all the comforts of home. But if you want the comforts of home, stay home. Otherwise remember, you’re going on vacation to get away from home. Experience new locales, new food, new customs, and most of all, new pillows.

Do you believe in packing light for your vacation or business trips? Do you take a carry-on bag or do you check a big suitcase? Share your ideas and suggestions on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

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