Twelve Holiday Travel Tips for 2018

November 15, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Thanksgiving is coming up in a week, which is going to kick off the holiday travel season. Three major religious groups have holidays in the month of December, which means there are going to be plenty of people traveling for The Holidays, which means lines and long waits, plenty of traffic and crowded airports. Here are a few tips to make your holiday travel less stressful.

1. Book everything NOW

Airline tickets, rental cars, hotel rooms and Airbnbs are all going fast, and you’re going to have a tough time finding any room at the inn, or a way to get there. And it’s only going to get harder as we get closer. Book your travel arrangements now, and then confirm them by phone a day or two before your travel days. You’d be surprised — or maybe you wouldn’t — at the number of travel plans that go awry because of a glitch.

2. Have gifts delivered to your destination

Many presents loaded into the back of a car. One of our holiday travel tips is to have your gifts delivered to your destination.Unless you’re just loading everyone into the car, don’t try to pack and carry all your gifts. Order them from your favorite online store and have them delivered to your destination. This beats trying to pack everything into your suitcase and checking it. If you have to pay to check your bag, you probably could have shipped your gifts for the same price. (Or for free, if you have Amazon Prime or your online store offers free shipping.)

Also, don’t try to time it so the packages coincide with your arrival. Order them as soon as you can — delivered in your name — so they arrive a few days before you open them. This gives you a little cushion in case something goes wrong.

But if you decide to take your gifts with you on the plane, don’t wrap them, since they may need to be checked at security.

3. Get travel insurance

Airlines are not very forgiving if you ever have to cancel your travel plans because of illness. You won’t be able to get a refund, although they might let you exchange your tickets. The same is true for many other travel providers. Travel insurance can help you recover your costs, even if they can’t help you salvage a vacation.

Travel insurance is also helpful if you get sick or injured while you’re traveling, especially when you’re overseas, and require medical attention. Your own medical insurance will probably not cover you when you’re out of the country, or even out of your network, so double-check what it will cover when you’re traveling, and make sure your travel insurance covers medical costs.

4. Pack only what will fit in a carry-on

Only take carry-ons, and try not to check any bags. If you roll your clothes and pack thinner layers, you can get up to 10 days’ worth of clothes in a standard carry-on, and never need a checked bag. Remember, you’re going for a short holiday vacation, you’re not moving there.

How are you going to do that, you ask? Here are seven additional tips:

  1. Roll your clothes, don’t fold them. Rolling takes up less space and results in fewer wrinkles.
  2. Pack half as many clothes as you think you’ll need and then do laundry one day while you’re there.
  3. Mix and match outfits. Rather than packing individual and unique outfits for each day, wear colors from the same palette so different shirts and pants go together.
  4. Only pack one bulky sweater. Take thinner layers and a pullover fleece to keep warm. You can swap out the t-shirt/undergarments, and re-wear over layers to save space.
  5. Don’t take your own pillow. I’ve seen people check two suitcases and take a carry-on because they packed their winter parka and pillows from home.
  6. Don’t take a lot of books and things you “hope” to do. Put books on a Kindle or tablet, and look for things to do at your destination.
  7. Rather than trying to take big toiletries, like hair spray or big shampoo bottles, just buy what you need when you’re there. Again, if this can save you from checking a bag, you’re saving anywhere from $25 – $50.

5. Be polite and patient

Traveling can be stressful throughout the year, but when everyone’s doing it, things tend to get a little stressful and we’re more likely to let our emotions get the best of us. As Marcie Boyle, a travel agent in Chesterfield, MI recently told USA TODAY:

Expect that everyone believes their trip is more important than yours. Expect the airports and planes to be crowded. Expect security, restroom, and restaurant lines to be extra-long. Expect to encounter less experienced travelers who may not know the tricks for getting through an airport quickly.

In short, just remember that everyone has a place to go, and the professionals are doing their best to get everyone there. If you blow your top at a ticket agent, not only are you going to ruin their day, but you may not get what you were hoping to get.

Remember, gate agents have the power to say “yes” and “no” to whatever you need, and yelling at them won’t get a “yes.” I’ve been in a few situations where the person in front of me yelled and screamed at a gate agent, and couldn’t get a ticket to another flight. But when I showed up, as sweet as honey, not only did I get the ticket I needed, I even got a food voucher.

So be nice, be polite. Remember, this is the season for family and togetherness. If you can be patient, pack light, and plan ahead as much as possible, you’ll be able to arrive at your holiday destination with a minimum fuss and stress, and be able to enjoy your holiday, whichever one you celebrate.

How do you pack for holiday vacations? Where do you go, to visit family or have a family getaway? Share your tips and stories with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Frank Jania (Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0)

Four Post-Holiday Return Travel Tips

December 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

A month ago, you couldn’t swing a full Christmas stocking without hitting an article about pre-holiday travel plans, and what you were allowed to bring on a flight and what you couldn’t.

Things like “don’t pre-wrap gifts in case the TSA needs to check them” and “Pies are allowed through TSA security checkpoints” are very helpful to know.

But what about going home? What special things do you need to know about that?

If you’re like most people, going home usually sees less careful packing, a lot more chaos, and an increased chance of leaving something behind. You’ve got gifts to fit into your bags and you have to get to the airport on time, or you have to hit the highway while everyone else is heading home too.

Here are four ways to avoid stress at the airport or on the road during your post-holiday return travel trip.

1. Remember, the 3-1-1 rule always applies, even on sealed bottles.

If you got a bottle of Scotch, wine, or even a bottle of perfume, even if it’s sealed up, you can’t carry it onto the flight with you. You are allowed to check it in your luggage though, but you want to make very sure it’s well-padded.

Fodor’s Travel Guide recommends you wrap a bottle in clothing a couple of times to protect it:

One method involves putting the wine bottle in a sock, wrapping a piece of clothing around the bottle’s neck until it’s as wide as the bottom of the bottle, and then wrapping the bottle with additional clothing pieces (like shirts). You can add a watertight plastic bag for some extra security. Travelers can also use bubble wrap, instead of clothing, to wrap the bottle, which adds some additional protection for the journey.

2. Ship your gifts home instead of carrying them.

I hope you left plenty of room in your suitcase for the return trip home for all the gifts you got. If you didn’t, you can fill up another suitcase and check it, paying the checked bag fee.

Better yet, you can ship your gifts via UPS or USPS and not have to deal with them until you get home. If you send them the day before you leave, you can also make sure you get home before the gifts arrive. While the costs will vary, there’s a decent chance it will be less than the checked luggage costs, and you won’t have to horse that suitcase around the airport and back to your car.

3. You can bring back leftovers, but they need to be frozen solid.

The TSA will allow frozen eggnog to be taken onto flights during your holiday return travel trip. The TSA will allow things like eggnog or Grandma’s famous wildebeest gravy, but it must be frozen solid and in a cooler. You can also use those freezer packs to keep everything cold, but they must also be frozen solid.

Also, keep in mind that if you carry on a cooler, that counts as one of your carry-on items: you still get a carry-on bag and a personal item that’s small enough to fit underneath the seat in front of you. So if your cooler is a third item, check the carry-on bag or pack the personal bag in the carry-on. Don’t try to cheat and bring on the third item.

(And just ask Grandma for the gravy recipe in the future.)

4. Get the travel apps for your travel method.

I’ve harped again and again on having the right apps on your phone for travel: your airline’s mobile app (which lets you check in 24 hours before your flight) and/or Waze, the real-time GPS app that shows you traffic jams and accidents.

No matter what other apps you get, you need a GPS app and your airline app if you want to avoid the travel hassles our parents dealt with when we were kids.

If you don’t have those installed yet, install them and set them up before you head home. Take a few minutes and familiarize yourself with them, and try to do it a day or two before you leave. You can always use Waze to help you get back to the airport on January 2nd, because you can avoid any traffic delays and get there on time. And of course, the app will help you check in faster and avoid the whole check-in line.

And if you still have to check bags, check them at the porter stand outside the airport and then use the app to check in. Just don’t forget to get to the airport two hours early.

What are some of your post-holiday return travel tips? How do you reduce your headaches when you’re heading back home? Share your best tips in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Konstantin RyabitsevM/small>

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