Six Things to Know About Micro-Cations

August 29, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

The latest trend with vacations — other than creating a playful new word — is to take short trips that last no more than 4 nights.

No longer referred to as just “long weekends,” the travel industry is now calling these mini-trips micro-cations. Makes sense, since you don’t always have to do them over the weekend.

I’m on board with the micro-cations trend though. According to a study by Allianz Travel Insurance, (n)early three-fourths (72 percent) of Millennials took at least one micro-cation in the last year, while 69 percent of Gen X’ers and 60 percent of Baby Boomers did the same.

It makes perfect sense! After all, it’s hard to get away for a week or two when you have to deal with work, school, and family obligations. But grabbing 3 or 4 days, even in the middle of the week, can be a nice way to take a break, and even take a break more often.

Here are six things you can do with micro-cations.

Man and woman jumping into a pool fully clothed. This is the kind of crazy stuff you can on micro-cations, if you're so inclined.

  1. You can add them onto a business trip. This is also called a bleisure trip, where you combine business and leisure travel. You’ll already be in the area, so there’s no need to pay travel costs, and you only have to pay for your personal lodging, food, and so on, but you’ve saved on the travel costs.
  2. You can visit some places in the off-season. One thing that’s great about living in Orlando is that we can visit the theme parks whenever we’d like, and we know to avoid them during the peak tourist season. So the best times to go are right before Spring Break, right after school starts, and right after Fall Break. You can take your own micro-cation in an off-season and miss the biggest crowds.
  3. Things may cost a little less in the middle of the week. Not only are crowds smaller, but prices may be lower. There could be special mid-week packages or even special hotel rates. Just stay away from the hotels popular with the business crowds: Those prices are higher during the week and lower on the weekends..
  4. You can take more of them. Nearly a third of Millennials in the Allianz study took three or more micro-cations in a year. If you only get two weeks of vacation (10 working days), that makes it hard to see very many places in a single year. But you can get three or even four micro-cations in a single year. Combine them with a weekend, and you can get your money’s worth while still only taking a couple days off at a time.
  5. It’s financially easier to take shorter trips. How many of us (or our parents) would save for a year or two for that one big vacation? You might have saved a lot of money and still ended up paying for it after you got home. But with micro-cations, you don’t spend as much, which makes saving up for them a lot easier.
  6. If you decide you don’t like it, you haven’t wasted your entire trip. Have you ever been on a vacation that just went miserably? I have. Believe me, they’re not fun. And it’s worse when one goes south on day 2 of a 7-day trip. Now, I’m not saying this is a positive point of a micro-cation, but I am saying that if you end up having a vacation that goes south (figuratively), you won’t have to put up with it for too long before you can go home again.

Micro-cations are becoming the new trend, especially for Millennial and Gen X travelers: 25% of Millennials don’t want to spend more money on a longer vacation, and 40% of Gen X-ers say it’s easier to take time off work for a short trip.

What do you think about micro-cations? Have you taken any, or would you take one? If you took one, what did you like or dislike about it? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: PXHere.com (Creative Commons 0)

About 

Erik Deckers is a travel writer, as well as a content marketer and book author. He is the co-author of Branding Yourself, No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine. Erik has been blogging since 1997, and has been a newspaper humor columnist for over 20 years

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