How to Manage It When Your Flight Is Canceled

August 15, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

My wife and daughter flew to New York a few weekends ago to visit some family, and were meant to fly back on a Sunday afternoon. However, this was a weekend of major storms (there was flooding in Brooklyn!), and all the flights in the New York area were canceled on that Sunday evening.

After standing in line for a couple hours, all they could manage to get was a standby flight the following evening. They went back to my wife’s cousin’s and spent the day there again. They returned to the airport at the appropriate time, and it happened again: All the flights were canceled.

This was Monday evening, and my daughter had already missed a class and a day of work, and was about to miss another day of work on Tuesday.

My mother-in-law came to the rescue however. She drove up Monday night from Central Florida to Newark, New Jersey, arriving Tuesday evening. They turned around and drove back to Florida that night, getting home on Wednesday afternoon, nearly 60 hours after they were supposed to leave

Thunderstorms may require you to make other plans if your flight is canceled

Dark Night Thunderstorm Lightning Sky Storm

Given the crazy weather patterns, the way airlines fill up (and sometimes overbook) their flights, and the frequent occurrence of Murphy’s Law — “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong” — it’s a good idea to make contingency plans for your vacations and business trips, to ensure you don’t run into the same kinds of problems.

But you don’t want to start making contingency plans when you’re standing in a 3-hour line with the faint glimmer of hope of getting a standby flight. Here are a few things you should do to prepare your contingency plans in case your flight is canceled.

First, make sure you purchase travel insurance before your trip. Get it as soon as you book your tickets, in fact. If your flight or trip gets canceled due to natural disasters, it doesn’t cover you if you bought it after the natural disaster occurred. That is, if you buy travel insurance two days before you leave because a hurricane is just boiling up, you won’t be covered. You needed to buy the insurance well before the hurricane was even a tropical depression in the middle of the ocean.

Second, make sure you understand your passengers’ rights when a flight is canceled. You need to know things like the airline doesn’t “owe” you anything if it’s canceled due to weather or other events outside their control (riots, strikes, war)> But if it’s canceled because of something in their control (mechanical issues, plane change, crew shortage), they have to help you out: food vouchers, hotels, even switching to another airline. Be sure to review your rights so you know what you can ask for and what they won’t cover.

Next, consider booking your flight and vacation with a travel agent. This is not a more expensive option.

Let me say that again: It does not cost more money to book your plans through a travel agent. They get paid in commissions from the airline and hotels, you don’t pay them. If anything, they may save you a little money.

But if there’s a problem, you can get your travel agent to start working on it, and they can make other arrangements on your behalf. (Plus, if anyone needs to wait on hold for an hour or more, wouldn’t you like to skip that yourself?)

Install apps for your favorite rental car agency on your phone. When my wife first thought about driving home, she went down to the rental car agencies — she had to take a shuttle after standing in line for nearly two hours — and not only were the cars gone for the night, there was a 48-hour hold on renting out any more cars. But if she’d had, say, Enterprise’s or Hertz’s app on her phone, she could have booked the car as soon as the flight was canceled and still gotten one. Or she could have booked a car at a facility several miles away and caught a Lyft or Uber there.

Install your airline’s app too. When a flight gets canceled, it’s the responsibility of the airline to book you on the “next available seat.” And they’ll notify you by text or email when they do it, but you could also get notifications through your app. You might even be able to make some arrangements via the app, although don’t make that your first strategy. Maybe try that while you’re standing in line.

Speaking of standing in line, go to another gate to rebook your flight. When a flight gets canceled, a lot of people will run up to their original gate to get rebooked. But there’s nothing magical about that gate: Every gate in the airline is connected to the same system, so any agent at any gate should be able to help you. Leave your gate and walk to another one where the flight has just left, and ask them for help.

Note: Some airlines are going away from this model. My wife said that her airline would not provide that service and everyone from all the flights that had been canceled — and that was all of them — had to stand in a customer service line, which only had five people working at the desk. She waited for nearly two hours and there were 40 people in front of her. When she looked behind her, she estimated there were at least 150. So if you learn there’s going to be trouble, make a bee line for the customer service desk immediately.

If you find yourself in that situation, that’s the time to call the airline’s customer service hotline. Even if you have to wait on hold while you wait in line, do both. Either way, you’ve got both bases covered, and you’ll reach a real person.

Another thing my wife learned is that the airline will only match your flight with an identical flight. So if you have a direct flight, they will only put you on a direct flight. You can’t get a one-layover flight to a different city. For example, if your layover city is the place with weather problems, you could fly to a different layover city and get home from there. But if you flew a nonstop flight, they won’t do that for you. And the reverse is true: if you have a layover flight, they won’t put you on a nonstop flight.

Finally, don’t get upset at the agents helping you. These are not the people responsible for the weather, making the decision to cancel your flight, or the kink thrown into your plans. Yelling at them won’t make them find you a better solution, but I can tell you from personal experience that being kind and sweet to them will make them want to find you a solution as quickly as possible.

(I once watched a guy bellow at a gate agent, and she apologized but said she was not able to help him. At. All. When it was my turn, I was all sweetness and sunshine, and I got a ticket on an alternate flight right away.)

Bottom line: Don’t wait until you’re in a sticky situation before you start looking for solutions. Make a few arrangements beforehand, even if it’s working with a travel agent and installing a couple apps on your phone, so you aren’t trying to figure out what to do when you learn your flight has been canceled.

How do you cope with major disruptions to your travel plans? What are some of your tips and tricks? Tell us about them on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Maxpixels.net (Creative Commons 0)

About 

Erik Deckers is a travel writer, as well as a content marketer and book author. He is the co-author of Branding Yourself, No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine. Erik has been blogging since 1997, and has been a newspaper humor columnist for over 20 years

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