Five Summer Road Trip Planning Secrets

May 30, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

We just finished Memorial Day weekend and the unofficial start to summer. That means several weeks of travel getaways, whether it’s a weekend out of town or a couple weeks at the beach.

If you’re taking a summer road trip out of town this summer, here are a few things you need to remember. Whether you’re hanging out by the pool, on the beach, or even your kid’s tournament, whether you’re going for a day or a few weeks, here are five things to remember before you leave.

1. Get a car checkup before you leave.

You need to prepare your care for your next summer road trip.Your car can most likely handle whatever city driving you’re going to throw at it, but a 500-mile summer road trip could push it to its limits. Make sure you get the oil changed, the fluids topped off, the tires and spare are properly inflated, the filters have been changed, and that the AC is fully functional.

You may even want to get a wheel alignment since misaligned wheels can eat into your car’s fuel efficiency. Plus, the cost of repairing a breakdown could wreck your entire vacation budget if you break something you weren’t planning on.

If you’re not sure about whether your car can make a long summer road trip, consider renting a car instead. You won’t put the wear and tear on your car, and you can have a brand new one in excellent working condition. The AC will work, you’ll have a lot of the latest features and advances (like a touchscreen display that connects to your mobile phone), and you could even have roadside coverage depending on your rental agency.

2. Take plenty of water with you.

Don’t just plan on stopping for water and beverages during regular stops. For one thing, gas station water costs 2 – 4 times more than the grocery store. Pack a small cooler with a few bottles and keep them in the car with you. If nothing else, they’ll help you out if you have a breakdown or have to spend several hours walking around during the day.

Be sure to take water with you on your outdoor excursions too. As summers are getting hotter and hotter — we hit 95 in Central Florida on Memorial Day Monday — you’re more likely to get dehydrated and suffer the ill effects. So drink up and stay hydrated. Drink more than you think you need rather than thinking you can go without.

3. Be sure to wear sunscreen and sun protection.

If you’re going to be outside for more than 30 minutes, rub sunscreen on exposed areas, including your face and your neck. Look for a high SPF rating and something that’s waterproof and sweat proof.

Don’t forget sunglasses or eye protection. You can also use a hat to shade your eyes and face from the sun (a big floppy hat will cover up a lot more than a baseball cap). And remember, if you’re out on a boat this summer, the reflection of the water can also cause sunburns. So don’t assume your hat is giving you enough protection — you’re getting the bounce back off the water’s surface, so you still need sunscreen.

Don’t worry about a quick trip to the mailbox or from the car to your next stop though — store, restaurant, movie theater. You don’t need to break out the parasol and long sleeves for that. Just take precautions and be careful if you’re going to have prolonged exposure to the sun.

4. Check the weather forecast and know what’s typical for the area.

Use your favorite weather app to determine the weather during your travel dates. Of course, you can’t know what the weather is going to be like six weeks into the future, but you can get a good idea of what it will be like three days before you leave. There are a few travel planners on sites like Accuweather.com, the Weather On Wheels app, and the Weather Network.

Similarly, check out the historical weather patterns for the area, or even better, call a local. If you’re staying at a hotel, call the front desk or concierge and ask them the seasonal weather is usually like. For example, Indiana doesn’t get terribly hot until July and August, and it rarely rains. On the other hand, that’s Central Florida’s rainy season: Not only is it terribly hot, but it rains nearly every single day between 12:00 noon – 3:00 pm.

This means if you’re visiting any of the theme parks, book your lunch around 1:00 pm and don’t let the rain chase you out. Let everyone else leave and the park will be a little emptier for the afternoon and evening.

5. Leave extra time to arrive.

I’ll be honest, I hate traveling over the summer. Everyone is out, they’re hot and sweating and irritable, and there are traffic jams and lines everywhere, so tempers run short. It’s worse when you’re planning on getting somewhere at a certain time, only to find the route is jammed up and you’re not sure if you’re ever going to get there, let alone get there on time.

The general rule of summer driving is to assume that traffic delays will happen and that there’s nothing you can do to make them go faster. But you can plan for them and even avoid them.

If you’re not familiar with an area, study a map before you get there. Find out where the main through streets, bypasses, and known-only-to-local routes are.

Make sure you have Waze installed on your phone, and preprogram some of your destinations (like restaurant reservations) into your Favorites section. You can even preprogram your arrival times, and Waze will calculate your departure time based on historic traffic patterns. And if something pops up, like an unexpected traffic delay, you’ll be alerted about a new time to depart.

How do you prepare for your summer road trip? Do you have any recommendations for your fellow travelers? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

Photo credit: tbarcturus (Pixabay.com, Creative Commons 0)

About 

Erik Deckers is a travel writer, as well as a content marketer and book author. He is the co-author of Branding Yourself, No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine. Erik has been blogging since 1997, and has been a newspaper humor columnist for over 20 years

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