11 Secrets to Packing Light On Your Next Trip

February 28, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

A friend recently told me that the last time she and her husband flew somewhere, they packed one big suitcase so they could avoid paying for a second checked bag charge on their airline.

“Didn’t you carry on your bags?” I asked.

“Well, just our personal bags. But we figured we could save some hassle if we just checked our bag.” (They did, but they still paid the fee for it.)

I tend to be a little. . . frugal when it comes to needlessly giving other people my money. I’m not cheap by any means — I’ll happily make frivolous, impulsive purchases, like a latte or a book. But I’ve found that I have less money to spend on those things if I do things like pay to check my suitcases. Especially because I know the ultimate secret to gaming the luggage system.

Pack everything into a carry-on bag!

Okay, it’s not really a secret, but I see so many people packing giant suitcases for relatively short trips that I think a lot of people still don’t know it.

Packing light is really quite simple. You get two carry-on items per passenger: a personal item that fits under your seat (a purse, backpack, or briefcase) and a carry-on suitcase, such as a 21-inch rolling suitcase. In my friend’s case, they could have each taken their own carry-on bag and never checked a bag in the first place.

And yet people will pack a large suitcase per person(!) for a one week vacation, even when they’re going to a place where shorts and t-shirts are suitable. I mean, if you’re traveling to Antarctica, you can be forgiven for packing more than one bulky sweater. But if you’re traveling to a non-winter destination this Spring Break, or are going on a business trip for less than 10 days, you should be able to fit everything into a single rollaboard suitcase. Here’s how you do it.

Packing light in an Atlantic carry-on suitcase

Okay, so we didn’t roll the clothes, but we’re still packing light for this trip.

  1. You don’t need one outfit for every day. Take one pair of pants for every three days and one shirt for every two days of your trip. Make sure you have enough underwear and socks for the entire trip (I usually add one extra pair of each), but you can also do laundry halfway through the trip or at least wash your underwear and socks in the sink.
  2. Pack clothes that go with each other. Don’t take unique outfits. Wear colors that can go together so you can mix and match them and create new outfits. For example, two pairs of pants and three shirts gives you six outfits. That’s better than six pants and shirts.
  3. Roll your clothes, don’t fold them. Folding your clothes can cause wrinkles, but if you roll your pants and shirts carefully, you can prevent wrinkles. Some packing experts also suggest you fold-and-stack your shirts vertically, but you still have the wrinkling problem.
  4. Don’t take “just in case” clothes. My wife and I used to pack a nice outfit “just in case” we ever went to a fancy restaurant. We finally stopped doing that since all the restaurants we went to allowed casual clothes. If we wanted to go to a nice restaurant, we made reservations in advance so we could pack accordingly.
  5. Don’t take basic toiletries. If you’re staying in a hotel, they’ll have things like shampoo, lotion, and toothpaste so leave yours at home. Otherwise, get travel-size toiletries, or better yet, buy your items when you arrive.
  6. Your children also get a carry-on bag. If you’re taking your young children with you, don’t pack their stuff in your bag. Let them be responsible for pulling their own little carry-on behind them. And if they’re too small for that, just remember, if they’re old enough to require a ticket, they get their own bag too, even if they’re too young to actually manage it.
  7. Wear your biggest, heaviest shoes on the plane. They’ll take up a lot of space in your bag, so wear them on the plane instead, and pack your smaller, lighter shoes. And just like your clothes, don’t take shoes for one day; take shoes that can be worn anywhere.
  8. If you think you might work out, you won’t. So don’t take your exercise clothes and shoes if you’re not sure you’ll do it. If exercising isn’t a regular habit yet, this is not the time to start, so don’t waste space with stuff you won’t use.
  9. Buy clothes at your destination. If you’re heading to a place known for its fashion, like France or Italy, don’t take a lot of clothes with you. Take advantage of your surroundings and pick up some trendy fashions at the local shops. That gives you plenty of room in your suitcase, but it also helps you look more like a local.
  10. Ship large and bulky items ahead. My father-in-law and I used to travel to trade shows in other states and even other countries. He always insisted on filling a large suitcase with samples and sales literature and taking it with us. Luckily, this was in the day before you had to pay for a checked bag, so it wasn’t expensive, but it sure was a problem the first time the airline lost our bag. We stopped checking our trade show items and shipped them ahead after that.
  11. Never, ever take your pillow. I know people who pack their pillows because they want all the comforts of home. But if you want the comforts of home, stay home. Otherwise remember, you’re going on vacation to get away from home. Experience new locales, new food, new customs, and most of all, new pillows.

Do you believe in packing light for your vacation or business trips? Do you take a carry-on bag or do you check a big suitcase? Share your ideas and suggestions on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

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Things to Pack and Avoid for a Full Day at the Theme Parks

February 14, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

As a veteran of the Orlando-based theme parks, I’ve seen it all. Families who plan for every contingency, and shove it all into a backpack whose size and weight would make a soldier nod quietly in appreciation.

People who come in so woefully unprepared that they spend $50 – $100 just to satisfy some small-but-nagging need they didn’t plan on, like a sweatshirt on a chilly day.

And people who know how to pack and plan for an entire 15 hour day, bringing the things they need and avoiding the things they don’t.

Here are a few things you should pack and not pack if you’re going to spend an entire day at Disney, Universal, Sea World, King’s Island, Six Flags, or any of the many theme parks dotting the country.

Things to Bring

A U.S. Marine with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) straps on a backpack while laying back on the pack, then rolling to one side and raising up from all fours. If you have to do this to pack for a day in the theme parks, you're taking too much.

A U.S. Marine with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) straps on a backpack while laying back on the pack, then rolling to one side and raising up from all fours.

  • Sun protection (sunscreen, sunglasses, and hats): It doesn’t matter what time of year you’re in the parks, or even if it’s a cloudy day, you can still get a sunburn. So take some sun protection, especially sweat-proof sunscreen, and use it regularly. Wear the hat and sunglasses to avoid getting a burn on your face and to protect your eyes.
  • Snack foods: Even if it’s just for a quick burst of energy or to tie you over when your kids are hungry two hours before dinner, take some granola bars or other individually-wrapped snack items. I personally like Clif bars, because they’re dense and filling despite their size. I used a few of these on my recent #DisneyParksChallenge.
  • Rain ponchos: If you come to Central Florida in the summer, it’s almost certainly going to rain in the afternoon. Buy some cheap ponchos at a Walmart and stuff them in your bag and wear them as needed. Pitch them at the end of your trip, because you’re not going to get them folded that small again. Hint: A lot of theme parks clear out when the rains come, so don’t leave when it gets rainy. Summer rains here last no more than an hour, but the parks will be a little emptier. Make lunch reservations for 1:30 or 2:00 because that’s when it usually starts.
  • Battery pack: For some reason, cell phones burn through their batteries more at the theme parks. (You can slow it down if you shut off Bluetooth and wifi.) But that may not be enough, so it helps to have some kind of battery backup. Whether it’s a 20,000mAH battery pack or one of those credit card-sized one-off chargers, you’ll need something to juice up and get you through the rest of the day.
  • Cell phone charger
  • This one is optional, but very helpful. Stuff a 3′ charging cord and cube into your bag just in case you find an electrical outlet during a rest break. Some restaurants have them tucked away in the corners, and you can occasionally find a plug in a bathroom. Even 10 minutes in a plug can buy you an hour of power. And if the universe is smiling on you, you’ll find an empty plug when you sit down for your lunch or dinner break.

Things to Avoid

  • A stroller: Unless you’ve got one of those all-terrain strollers with dual shocks and a portable generator, don’t bring a stroller with you. You can rent them inside every park everywhere, so there’s no point wrestling with one on the trip down and back.
  • Extra clothes: Unless you know for sure that you’re going to get cold, don’t take extra clothes “just in case,” or a change of clothes for a messy toddler. Similarly, if the morning is cold, but the day will warm up, try to tough out the cold temps rather than carrying around a sweatshirt or jacket all day. Keep in mind that we crank the AC up pretty high here in the summer and you can get cold if you spend a lot of time indoors. So if you get cold easily, take the sweater. Otherwise, don’t plan on every contingency. Check the weather before you go and pack accordingly.
  • Three days’ worth of diapers: You’re only going to the park for a single day. That requires at most six diapers. Don’t fill up your bag with the whole week’s worth of diapers. Just take what you’ll need each day. And put some wipes in a Ziploc bag, rather than taking the entire package. A lot of new parents pack up their kid’s entire changing table for day trips, and end the day with a bag that’s just as full as when they started.
  • Big bottles of water: Yes, you’re going to get thirsty. Yes, you need to stay hydrated. And yes, park water is expensive. But there are some parks that will give you water for free. You can get ice water when you sit down for lunch and dinner. And you can fill up your water bottle in a bathroom sink or special water bottle refill station. So there’s no need to bring a 1.5-liter bottle of water with you into the park. That’s 2.2 pounds of extra weight you’re carrying. Bring a smaller bottle and refill it as needed.

There are other things that are optional, but I tend not to carry just because of the weight, like a camera (my phone takes great pictures) or a guidebook (you can download an e-version on your Kindle app).

If you’re not sure of whether you should take something, think of the worst case scenario if you don’t have it, and decide whether you can live with that. Forgetting diapers for your 1-year-old can be a disaster, but leaving your guidebook behind won’t ruin your day.

What are your must-pack and must-avoid items on your theme park days? What do you absolutely need to have? Share your suggestions on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

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