How to Save Money and Time Attending a Festival in Another City

October 17, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

I recently returned from Lowell, Massachusetts and the Lowell Celebrates Kerouac festival where I was invited to speak and be a special guest at several of the events.

Jack Kerouac, author of the definitive road trip novel On The Road, was born and raised in Lowell. They were commemorating the 50th anniversary of his death on October 21, 1969.

I was fortunate enough to attend and participate in several of the events, which were scattered around the downtown Lowell area. I’ve attended a great number of festivals and conferences, both alone and with my family, and there are a few things I’ve learned over the years.

Whether you’re attending an arts or music festival held in a park, a large film or theater festival scattered around a city, or even a comic book convention in a huge convention center, there are a few things to keep in mind to save plenty of time and money while you’re there

1. Parking will be terrible

Downtown Lowell, Massachusetts, home of the Lowell Celebrates Kerouac Festival

Downtown Lowell, Massachusetts. Jack Kerouac grew up and went to high school a few blocks from here.

Unless you’re an organizer with special parking, or you get to the location super early, you’re not going to find a great place to park. And it’s going to be somewhat expensive. When you’re figuring out your budget for the event, take your parking costs into account. I’ve seen parking go for as much as $40 per day for event parking in big cities. Meanwhile, people will stay in a hotel 10 miles from the event just to save $30 on lodging prices.

If you’re getting a place based on price, look at the price difference between the closer hotel and the cheaper hotel + ride-sharing/parking. You may find that it’s actually cheaper to get the closer, more expensive hotel because you’ll save money on parking or ride-sharing. Plus, you can come and go as you need to, rather than wasting time driving to and from the event.

2. Book your lodging EARLY

Depending on your schedule, you may be on site all day long, so you only need the hotel as a place to keep your stuff and to sleep. If that’s the case, you probably don’t care where you’re located or what kind of room you have. But if you have to show up at the festival really early or are going to stay late, you’ll probably want to be as close as possible to avoid driving time.

The closest hotels always go the fastest, which means you need to book early. In some cases, you may not even want to wait until this year’s festival is over; book now for the next year’s festival and be sure to confirm the reservation a couple of times between now and then.

Also, some events will make arrangements for special event pricing, so be sure to check in with the organizer to see if they’ve set that up.

3. Plan your schedule

Since I was in Lowell as a special speaker, nearly all of my events were already planned for me. I knew where I had to be and when, so I just spent my downtime at some of the other events or working at one of the local coffee shops.

If you’re already a regular calendar user and access it from your mobile phone, book all your events and appointments in your calendar, along with the address and any other necessary information. That way, you don’t need to access the event guide or even use their app.

Scheduling also helps you avoid conflicts and double-booking. Some festivals have multiple events and breakout sessions, others have events in different locations. Check Google Maps to see the distance between all the event venues to make sure you can make it from one to the other in plenty of time. Be sure to include the addresses in your calendar listing, because you can click the address and open up to your favorite GPS app to navigate your way there.

4. Compare the cost of Uber/Lyft versus driving and rental cars.

I think I made a big mistake in Lowell this time: I rented a car and drove everywhere. My rental car costs were $240, plus gas. I rented a car, because the airport is about 30 miles from where I needed to be. However, I think I could have saved about $40 – $50 if I had just used Lyft to go everywhere, even to and from the airport.

You can look up on Lyft and Uber’s website to get trip estimates and compare that with the cost of renting a car and gassing it up before you return it. And if you’re going to be staying in a hotel close to the event, you almost certainly won’t need a rental car, so consider ride-sharing and taxis for any surprise transportation.

5. Carry your own lunch and snacks

Event food is super expensive, although some of it can be pretty fun. I go to the Central Florida Scottish Highland Festival and Games every year, and always love the food trucks they have there. Otherwise, I try to take granola bars and a few sandwiches for a cheap lunch, rather than pay $12 for a burned-yet-still-frozen hamburger and small Coke.

However, don’t cheap out on dinners. Those times should be spent with friends, especially if you only see them at the festivals. Find someplace that’s not too close, but not several miles away either. Walking distance is usually packed with festival-goers and the ones that are far away require a lot of logistical headaches.

How do you travel for festivals and special events? What strategies do you employ to save money? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: John Phelan (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 3.0)

5 Secrets to Traveling in a Big City

September 26, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

I lived for so long in a smallish city, and later in a small town, that when I moved to Indianapolis — a city of roughly 1 million people — it was very stressful to try to find my way around. Even before then, visiting was a real country-mouse-in-the-big-city adventure. But after working and driving around downtown, I got used to the chaos and constant motion going on around me, and I could navigate like a pro.

When I moved to Orlando — 2 million people — I was able to quickly adapt and find my way around, even when the city was at its busiest. Central Florida gets roughly 60 million visitors per year, which can make getting around rather nerve wracking, but the residents learn to take it all in stride.

But when I was recently in Washington DC, a city with some of the worst traffic in the entire country, I knew better than to try to navigate my way around by myself. I typically won’t do it unless I’m going to be there for a few days and I have time to figure it out, or if I’m going to be in a lot of different places all over the city.

If you’re traveling to a big city and you’re not used to it, here are a few ways you can function and get around without pulling your hair out.

1. Know that parking will be expensive.

Free parking in the big cities is about as rare as a singing unicorn. And when you do find public parking, you can bet that the parking prices will be sky high. When I was in Chicago 10 years ago, daytime parking was $50 for 8 AM – 5 PM.

There’s a very good chance you’re going to have to pay for parking at your hotel too. My Washington DC hotel charged $50 per night for parking, but it was worth it because I didn’t want to park in a public garage. They also let me leave my car there until 3 pm, which meant I didn’t have to take it with me and fight for parking at my last appointment.

If you’re staying in the city, research parking options before you even get there. Make sure your hotel has it, and consider long-term parking in a different location, like an airport, and then taking public transportation to your hotel.

2. Pick a hotel based on location, not price.

Traffic is always a big problem when traveling to a big city.When you stay in a new city, there’s going to be a lot of temptation to pick the cheapest hotel, especially if you’re trying to stay brand loyal. The problem is the cheap hotels are nowhere near the good locations; you’re going to pay a little more for easy access.

Several years ago, my father-in-law traveled to a trade show in Atlanta and stayed in a hotel his company picked for him and the company executives because it was $20 per night cheaper than the hotel right next to the convention center. The executives swore they would never stay that far from downtown again after they spent $40 per day in taxis and had to sit in rush hour traffic for an hour each way.

You may save money by getting a cheaper hotel, but you’ll end up being so far away, you’ll spend all those savings in ride sharing, taxis, or parking. Not to mention, you’ll be up to 60 minutes away from your destination, which is going to put a serious crimp in your travel plans.

3. Study maps and GPS apps before you go.

Whenever I go to a new city, I plan out for the places I want to go: the restaurants, coffee shops, meeting sites, and other attractions. I’ll even start planning before I’ve booked my hotel so I can make the best choice. However, I’ve learned I don’t really understand the city and the traffic patterns until I get there and can actually see what the city is like.

For example, I once traveled to Boston and got a hotel that I thought was easy walking distance to a conference center. And it was, as long as I didn’t mind walking along a five-lane parkway with no sidewalks. That didn’t show up on Google Maps, and I didn’t realize it until I got there.

4. Leave plenty of time to get where you’re going.

One thing you can count on in big cities is that there will always be traffic jams. You could have a traffic jam on I-4 in Orlando at 2:00 AM. (Trust me, I know.) And you could get stuck in major traffic, even traveling around the downtown area in the middle of the ay.

So check out the traffic conditions on Waze before you head out to your events to see if you need to add a little more travel time. Do the same if you’re using a ride sharing service, because they’ll be stuck in the same traffic. However, they also know the city better than you, so they’ll know the side streets to duck down to avoid the worst of it.

5. Use ride sharing or taxis

I’ve been to Washington DC twice in the last six months, and I can tell you that the smartest thing I did was to leave my car in the parking lot and take a Lyft everywhere. I was already paying for my parking but the cost of traveling everywhere on Lyft — $9 – $12 per trip — was less than I would have spent to park somewhere else.

And even if the ride sharing would have cost a little more, it was worth it to not have to drive around and around and around trying to find a parking space even remotely close to the place I needed to be. That would have added time to the actual commute time, not to mention the extra minutes spent walking from my car to the destination. And if it had been raining or beastly hot, that would have just been worse. At least with Lyft, I was able to go from door to door to wherever I needed to be.

What are your travel strategies when you’re in a big city, especially a new one? How do you find your way around? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: FrTed (Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0)

Five Reasons to Take a Fall Vacation

September 12, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Now that summer is over and the kids are back in school, this is the best time to start thinking about a fall vacation. But it doesn’t have to be a two-week trek to a whole different part of the world: Micro-cations are the new trend, so you could spend 3 – 4 days (a long weekend, really) and lay back and relax.

Maybe you can take a few days this October or November and spend it in a new city, enjoying the fall colors and cooler temperatures. Or if you live in Florida, you can head to the theme parks or the beach and enjoy the fact that the crowds have all gone back home.

Here are five reasons you should take a fall vacation (or micro-cation) for a few days.

1. The prices are lower for hotels and airfare.

Now that the peak travel season is over, the prices are lower for most vacation costs. You can get an airplane ticket for less than the summer prices, and your hotel costs are lower as well. This means you can stay an extra day, stay in a normally-more expensive hotel, or even fly at a more convenient time for the same amount you would have spent in the summer.

2. Fall vacation crowds are smaller.

Mackinac Island is a great place for a fall vacation.One of the best time to hit the Florida theme parks are right after school has started: all the kids are back in school, which means most corporate vacation seasons are also over. That means a smaller crowd inside the kid-friendly places. I can tell you that Wednesdays in October are thoroughly enjoyable in the Orlando theme parks.

It’s the same in all the other vacation attractions around the country: Museums tend to be a little less crowded, as are restaurants, sightseeing tours, and other tourist attractions. Lines and wait times are shorter and you can often get reservations at that hotel or restaurant you’ve been dying to try.

3. The temperature is more enjoyable.

Summers are plenty hot, which makes going outside a bit of a challenge. You have to stay plenty hydrated, and sometimes your day is just spent walking from shady spot to shady spot or spending the entire day inside for the air conditioning.

In the fall, the temperatures have cooled to a more manageable level, and you only have to put on a light sweater or even a sweatshirt to deal with the cooler days. It’s not so cold you have to wear a parka and mittens, so you can still enjoy your time outside.

4. There’s a bigger emphasis on relaxing.

When I was a kid, summer vacations were always about going somewhere and doing something. Even when we vacationed in Florida, we were always on the go. A day at the beach was hardly relaxing, because we had to drive there, fight for a spot in the sand, complain about the heat, wait in line for snacks, wait for a table at restaurants, and then whine about the sunburns and sand in our swimsuits. It wasn’t that fun, frankly.

With a fall vacation, I always feel more relaxed. Maybe it’s something about the lower temperatures, but it always makes me slow down. I’m more interested in going for a walk, especially in the woods. I can hang out, meander around a new city, or drive around and look at the leaves. Fall is more about seeing and enjoying, not rushing and doing.

5. It’s the last chance for a breather before the holidays.

Most of us have hectic, chaotic holiday seasons coming up: there are the different office parties, friends’ parties, and various different parties, shopping, and kids’ events you’ve got to attend. You can easily get overwhelmed with everything you have to do.

A fall vacation is the last chance to relax before the busy holidays begin, starting a week or two before Thanksgiving, and not ending until after the new year. Take a break at the end of October or early November, and spend a few days relaxing and taking it easy while you still can. That way, you won’t feel so wound up from summer vacation just as you start the silly season.

Are you going to take a fall vacation? Have you taken any, or would you take one? If you’re taking one this year, what are your plans? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Michael Sprague (Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0)

Five Lessons Learned on a Multi-Stop Road Trip

April 11, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Taking a road trip that lasts several days brings challenges and special problems, but they’re not that hard. Even if it’s just a one-day drive, it’s fairly straightforward: Drive to the place, stop a few times for a break, spend your time there, and drive back.

You’ll want to pre-plan your route and some of your stops, of course, as well as any hotel reservations, but the journey can be simple enough thanks to Google Maps and Waze.

But a multi-stop road trip has a few extra issues that can vastly complicate things. Staying in multiple cities and hotels, meeting with different people, going to different events — there are a lot more moving parts that can make your trip a bit difficult.

I recently finished up a week-long speaking tour that had me in Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. I drove from Orlando, stayed in the different cities where I was speaking, and would drive to the next city as soon as I was done. That way, I woke up in the next city, rather than in the old one.

When it was done, I drove over 2,000 miles, visited five different cities, and gave 13 different talks. These are the lessons I learned.

1. Rent a car.

If you’ve got an older car, or it’s a little small for a big trip, consider renting a car instead of cramming everyone into yours. This is especially helpful if you’re taking a much longer trip and don’t want to put all the mileage on your car. My trip was over 2,000 miles and while I’m hoping to get 300,000 miles out my car, I didn’t want to put that many on in one week.

You may even want to get a slightly bigger car than you have so you can be a little more comfortable. But if you’re driving a thousand miles or more, don’t ignore the gas mileage. I made the mistake once of accepting an upgrade to a Jeep Wrangler for an 800-mile trip, even though I had requested a Nissan. The gas mileage on the Jeep was half of the Nissan, and so my gas costs doubled.

Also, don’t let them talk you into the GPS option since you’ve got one on your phone. You can also skip the Sirius-XM radio and listen to podcasts or even subscribe to the Sirius-XM service for a month. Get some kind of temporary dashboard mount for your phone and keep your GPS on at all times. Just don’t forget to take it with you when you return the car.

2. Put your destinations in your calendar.

Somewhere in Tennessee. Be sure to stop and look around on your next road trip.

Somewhere in Tennessee. Be sure to stop and look around on your next road trip.

I did a little overkill on my planning here: I blocked off all my actual speaking appointments and created appointments for the drives to the destinations. That way, I could put in each address of each appointment. I even did this for my car rental and hotel stays in the calendar and included the confirmation numbers in the notes section.

That’s because I can set my iPhone’s default map app for Apple Maps, Google Maps, or Waze. I use Waze all the time, so that’s my default. Whenever I open a calendar appointment, I can tap the location, and Waze will open and find the route to my destination. I don’t have to search for the address and type it into the search bar. It’s especially useful if I’m in a hurry later.

(To set your default map, open your Google Calendar, open the Settings, and open Apps from Google. You’ll find it there.)

3. Set planned drives, and turn on the Tell Me When to Leave function.

You can also save some time if you schedule all your drives in Waze. You’ll start by entering the address of your destination and then the day and time you want to leave or arrive. Then, as you get into your car for the next leg of the trip, open Waze, pull up the Planned Drives list, and tap your next destination. You can even connect your calendar so you’re automatically notified when it’s time to leave based on the current and expected traffic patterns. (Do this in Waze’s settings.)

A few days before you leave, set up all your Waze preferences too, including favorite gas station brands, whether to avoid tolls and highways, and even the kinds of alerts you want to hear.

Otherwise, if you’re running your sound through your car stereo, Waze can get annoying as it tells you about every pothole and car on the side of the road. You can turn off individual alerts under the Alerts & Reports settings. I turned most of mine off, only keeping on the police alerts.

4. Take a laundry bag.

In the past, when I’ve taken long trips, it’s always been easier because I just unpack and put dirty clothes into my empty suitcase. (Of course, I keep them folded so I can fit everything back in again.) Then, when it’s time to leave, I don’t have to track everything down.

This time, moving from place to place, I kept everything in my bag, but I realized on Day 2 that I didn’t want to root through dirty clothes to find a clean pair of socks. So I stuffed my dirty laundry into a plastic shopping bag. It certainly made finding clean clothes easier, my suitcase got lighter every day, and I kept the laundry bag in the car.

5. Keep the car clean.

One very important lesson I learned a long time ago was the importance of a clean car or a clean office. As Anthony Bourdain stressed over and over in Kitchen Confidential, if you have a messy mise-en-place (“meez on ploss”), you can’t find anything and your brain can’t function properly. It can increase your stress level, which can make an already stressful situation worse.

As Bourdain said in his book,

If you let your mise-en-place run down, get dirty and disorganized, you’ll quickly find yourself spinning in place and calling for backup. I worked with a chef who used to step behind the line to a dirty cook’s station in the middle of a rush to explain why the offending cook was falling behind. He’d press his palm down on the cutting board, which was littered with peppercorns, spattered sauce, bits of parsley, bread crumbs and the usual flotsam and jetsam that accumulates quickly on a station if not constantly wiped away with a moist side towel. “You see this?” he’d inquire, raising his palm so that the cook could see the bits of dirt and scraps sticking to his chef’s palm. “That’s what the inside of your head looks like now.”

It’s so easy to just let the fast food sacks, empty cups and bottles, and snack wrappers pile up, throwing them into a foot well. And if you’re traveling with kids, it’s like the few toys and games they brought multiplied exponentially, and now the car is messier than their rooms.

Make it a habit to always through away your trash at every stop. Dump out all the cups and bottles, even if you stop just for a quick fill-up. Keep your kids’ toys and games in a bag and stow it in the trunk. Only give them one item for each leg of the trip. When they get tired of it, switch it out for another item once you stop again. Don’t just keep the bag in the front passenger seat, because then their stuff is cluttering up your own foot space, and it can be uncomfortable.

I took a solo 2,000-mile trip, and I actually had a good time. I enjoyed my time in the car, caught up on all my podcasts, and even enjoyed a few new ones. I made it to my destinations, was able to navigate easily, and it could not have been more smooth. It makes me want to do another tour in a few months.

How do you handle long road trips with many stops? If you’re a traveling salesperson or consultant, how do you navigate between destinations? Share your ideas with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

Photo credit: Erik Deckers (Used with permission)

Get The Best Hotel Deals On Your Time

March 28, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

I asked a friend, Daniel Bell, a hotelier at a high-end luxury hotel in Orlando about some tips for finding the best hotels, especially if you want to stay at a nice hotel. This is what he wrote.

For most of my adult life, I was not a frugal grocery shopper and did not value my dollar that much. I just bought what I wanted, no matter what it cost. If I had the money in hand, I would get it.

I started to wise up as I got older, and started paying attention to grocery stores that had offered special deals, especially Publix with their BOGOs and BOGOHOs (Buy One Get One/Buy One, Get One Half Off). Now, I take more advantage of the money I do have by seeing what will give me the best bang of for my buck.

You should adopt the same mindset when it comes to travel. As a hotelier, I know that good hotel deals are everywhere for travelers, including at luxury hotels, but how do you find the best ones without wasting a lot of time finding them?

Here are some tips for finding the best deals for hotels.

Hire a travel agent

The Ellis Hotel, formerly the Winecoff Hotel, in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Ellis Hotel, formerly the Winecoff Hotel, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Why do all the work if you can get someone else to do it right? Getting a travel agent is not for everyone though. If you are someone who does not care much about the fine details, as long as you have a place to rest your head, then a travel agent might be the right fit for you. They already have relationships with hotels and know how to book rooms online. And they have the know-how on finding great deals for you.

All you need to do is tell your agent where you want to go, let them know your budget, tell them what specific requests you have for the room and they will do the rest. Best of all, you don’t pay the agent for this work; they get commissions from the airlines and hotels for their work.

Google is your travel buddy

Do a Google search of the hotels in your destination area and you’ll see a short list of the top five hotels., as well as the typical rack rate prices. But there’s usually also a website and contact information for each hotel. So call them up and ask them two simple questions:

  1. What special deals and packages do you have for these dates?
  2. Are you part of a rewards program? (If the answer is yes, ask how can you sign up.)

From there, go to any of these travel sites and compare the prices. Hotels let these sites give deals that even the hotels do not advertise themselves, so you might find a better deal on a travel site than the hotel can give.

Rewards Programs

No matter how often you travel, becoming a rewards program member can be beneficial, even if you only go once a year. Many of these programs involve a way for you to save money and get a return, based on your loyalty to that specific hotel chain.

Some of these chains are part of a bigger network of hotels that honor one single rewards program. And others will reward you with points if you use their branded credit card. For example, a credit card from Marriott or IHG (Holiday Inn) can help you earn points for every dollar you spend.

You can even get special upgrades if you use that credit card to book your hotel room. (The same is true for airline credit cards and booking airline tickets.)

How do you find hotel deals? What are some of your favorite hotels to stay in, regardless of whether you got the best rate or not? Share your favorites with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Four Things Travelers with Medical Issues Should Know About Luxury Hotels

March 14, 2019 by · 3 Comments 

I asked a friend, Daniel Bell, a hotelier at one of the high-end luxury hotels in Orlando about some of the things he wishes every hotel traveler knew before they checked into their hotel, especially as it pertains to medical issues. These tips can make your stay much more pleasant and enjoyable, and help you deal with medical issues if they arise. This is what he wrote.

People check into luxury hotels for various reasons. I have been working for one for two years, and I’ve met all kinds of travelers, newbies and hotel veterans, businesspeople at a conference to families on a relaxing weekend away from home.

This may come as a surprise, but not everything goes right every time people stay at luxury hotels. We try our very best to make your stay a great one, but there are times when you may need something extra or important, and you may not know how to get it. Whether you have a medical need, a personal need, or just that right detail to make everything special, there are certain things you should know when you arrive at your luxury hotel.

1. Ask all of your questions.

The Grand Bohemian, one of the finest luxury hotels in Orlando, FL.

The Grand Bohemian in downtown Orlando, Florida.

Do not be afraid to ask any and all questions that come to mind, both when you book the hotel and when you check in. For example, if you or a family member have pet allergies, ask if the hotel is pet-friendly. Some rooms are designated as pet rooms, so you may get checked into one, and your allergies can flare more than an S.O.S. signal. Ask about nearby restaurants, especially if you have special dietary needs. If you forget your prescriptions, ask the concierge where the closest pharmacies are, and whether any of them deliver.

2. Don’t assume you’ll remember what to bring.

Travelers forget things all the time — we’re all human. I get calls from guests who forget simple things like feminine hygiene products. It’s a simple thing, but not having that item can cause a lot of problems. Luxury hotels should be able to provide your small toiletries and personal items, but you should know where you can buy personal hygiene items. (Another question to ask the concierge.) There are times my hotel has run out of these items, so it’s always good to have a backup plan, but don’t be afraid to ask if the hotel has any of your item in stock.

3. Make sure you know how to use the phone for emergencies.

Not all luxury hotels have medical personnel on property. That means there is very little the hotel can do to address a medical situation. If you or a loved one have a medical condition that might ever require an emergency call, it’s imperative that you know how to use the room phone and learn the procedure of calling the paramedics. You might think it’s universal, but in the United States, you dial 911, but in the United Kingdom it’s 999. South Africa is 10-177, and in Germany, it’s 112. And don’t forget, sometimes you have to dial 9 first just to get an outside line.

4. Make special requests when booking the room.

My hotel always wants to serve our guests with excellence, but we prefer to know any special requests in advance. Luxury hotels do allow special requests to be made upon booking a room because we have certain amenities to honor those requests. If there are certain things we should know (e.g. don’t put someone with pet allergies in a pet-friendly room), it helps us serve you better if you let us know what needs to be in the room before you stay at the hotel. That way, it’s already waiting for you when you arrive.

Those are some of the basic things to remember when checking into luxury hotels, and I’m sure you’ve had some valuable experiences as well. What else would you tell your fellow travelers? Are there other things you’ve seen or done in the past?

Share your ideas and suggestions on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Michael Rivera (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 4.0)

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