Five Things to Listen to That Aren’t Music On Your Next Trip

April 25, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

If you’ve ever been on a trip and wanted to listen to something else other than music, you would find there are quite a few options available if you only knew where to look. Maybe you’re a fan of podcasts or audiobooks, maybe you want something more like a movie for your mind, or maybe you’d like to hear what’s happening in another part of the world.

If you’re looking for something other than music, and you want to be informed, entertained, or educated, there are several options for you to try. And whether you’re traveling by yourself or with your family, there’s something for everyone to enjoy. Here are a few of the options I use whenever I’m on the road.

1. Listen to News From Another Country

Sure, sure, you can listen to your local news, and you should do that anyway. It’s always good to be informed about what’s happening close to home. But it’s sometimes interesting to hear what other countries are saying about what’s happening over here. And it’s especially interesting to hear what kinds of issues are affecting those countries.

For example, I like to listen to the CBC and BBC via their apps or the TuneIn app. It lets me hear about their local issues, as well as some of the global news we never hear at home.

I also have a Canadian podcast I listen to called CANADALAND (they capitalize it that way, not me!), which covers not only Canadian media criticism but a lot of their local issues affecting different provinces and cities. It’s interesting to have some insider knowledge about a different country, and I’ve had some great conversations with several Canadians about what’s happening back home.

2. Podcasts

I’m a regular podcast listener because I like it better than most commercial radio these days. I have about 12 – 15 podcasts I listen to every week. There are a few general interest podcasts, like Alec Baldwin’s Here’s The Thing, Broken Record With Malcolm Gladwell, and David Tennant’s aptly-named podcast, David Tennant Does A Podcast.

As a writer, I also have some writing specific podcasts I never miss, like Jeff Pearlman’s Two Writers Slinging Yang, Grammar Girl, and The Downtown Writers Jam With Brad King.

Whatever your job, hobby, or side hustle happens to be, I can almost guarantee there’s a podcast about it. Just find your favorite podcast app — I prefer Overcast, but Stitcher has a premium model that gives you extra content — and pick a few podcasts to start listening to. Don’t feel like you have to listen to every episode all the way through — fast forward or just delete and move on. Try out new shows and find what you lie as you settle into an easy-to-manage routine. That way, when you’re heading out on your trip, you’ve got a small bank of episodes saved up and ready to work through.

3. Audiobooks

The audiobook industry is a billion dollar industry, and is a great way to read books without actually reading them. You can borrow CDs from your library, download electronic resources from the same library (get the Hoopla or OverDrive app; ask your librarian if you’re not sure how to use it), or download thousands of free audiobooks through services like LibriVox.

And you can also download the latest books through Amazon’s Audible, a service that lets you download three titles each month. The first month is free, and then you pay $14.99 each month thereafter. If you’re leaving on a trip soon, take it for a test drive and decide whether to keep it right after your trip ends.

4. Audio Drama

This used to be called “radio theatre” (note the -re, which means it’s fancy), but now it’s called audio drama because it’s rarely heard on the radio. it doesn’t matter what you call it though, because there are literally tens of thousands of hours of content available on the Internet, most of it for free.

The Overcast app and Decoder Ring Radio Theatre podcasts, one of my favorites on every road trip. Consider this for your next trip.

The Overcast app and Decoder Ring Radio Theatre podcasts, one of my favorites on every road trip

A lot of it comes in the form of new podcasts, like one of my favorites, Decoder Ring Theatre (which produced several of my plays nearly seven years ago), Girl In Space by Sarah Werner, and the wonderful The Orbiting Human Circus.

There’s also plenty of OTR (old-time radio) you can download, like Great OTR, a website run by a friend of mine.And nearly all of the OTR content online is free to download: Just Google “free old-time radio” and you’ll be shown thousands of hours of free old radio shows, from comedies to mysteries to science fiction to police drama.

Download them to your hard drive and load them to your favorite MP3 player., or save them to Dropbox, and then use an app like Cloudbeats to listen to the files directly from Dropbox. (Make sure you set this up before you leave on your trip though.)

5. Stand-Up Comedy

My wife and kids love listening to stand-up in the car. They’ll turn on Pandora or YouTube Radio, select a favorite comic, and then hit play. Since most of these comics’ acts have been released as albums broken down into tracks, the algorithms will generate random playlists of similar comics and take them through a plethora of comics and their work, just like if you started listening to one song from a favorite artist.

It’s a great way to find new comics, stumble on some old favorites, and turn the trip into a series of hilarious surprises. My family will reach the end of a two-hour trip and not want to get out of the car once they arrive, because they’re waiting to finish just one more routine.

(Be careful listening with little kids in the car: some comics are not suitable for children, and given the random nature of their work, you may find yourself quickly fumbling for the Next button.)

What do you listen to when you’re not listening to music? What are some must-hear programs and podcasts? Share your suggestions with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

7 Must-Pack Items for Your Next Vacation

November 29, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

When I go on vacation, my goal is to be away from the hotel, Airbnb, or family member’s house as much as possible. I want to be out doing things, seeing things, and experiencing a new place. Maybe it’s a house on the beach, a visit to a new city, a return trip to Indiana, or I’m at a conference, spending a couple of “bleisure” days before or after a trip.

Regardless of what I’m doing, there are a few things I always pack wherever I go. These are things you should pack for your next vacation or holiday trip.

First, make sure you have a portable battery pack to keep your phone charged while you’re out and about. There are several brands available, but I’ve always had good luck with the Anker brand of batteries. The typical battery pack is a little bigger and heavier than a mobile phone, weighing about 12 ounces, and it fits in a purse, backpack, or even a pocket. Get one that’s at least 20,000 mAH, and you’ll be able to charge an iPhone 6 or 7 times, and a Galaxy phone 5 or 6 times. Then, just charge it up each night when you’re back at your hotel or house.

Mobile phone with a battery nearly dead. Be sure to take a battery and charging cable on your next vacation.Next, be sure to carry a charging cable and USB plug with you during the day. If you can ever plug into a wall socket, even if it’s just for 20 minutes while you’re eating lunch, you can extend your phone’s battery reserves and avoid tapping into your portable battery until later. My daughter carries one in her backpack whenever we’re cruising Disney World or Universal Studios. When we stop for lunch, we can take turns getting a 15-minute boost of power.

Speaking of power, consider tossing a PowerCube, a small charging block by Allocacoc, into your suitcase. It comes with three regular plug outlets and two USB charging ports, and is just a couple inches in size. You can get PowerCubes that plug directly into the wall or come with a 5′ or 10′ extension cord. This lets you plug multiple devices into a single plug, or you can even plug another cube in and expand your charging capabilities. Perfect for the family with multiple devices and only a couple available sockets.

Finally, if you go on working vacations like I do, or you absolutely need wifi access for your devices but you’re traveling in a foreign country, consider carrying a mobile wifi hotspot like the Skyroam Solis. One of these units is $150, and costs $9 per day to operate (they have pay-as-you-go day passes for access). If you absolutely have to have wifi access during a trip, and you don’t want to pay for hotel wifi, or you’re going to be away from civilization for a time, a mobile wifi hotspot will connect up to five devices and save the day.

Be sure to take a travel pillow with you for the actual trip. I rarely take one myself, but I know plenty of people who swear by it. You can sleep sitting up without giving yourself serious neck pain, which is not a fun way to start or end a trip. One tip I’ve learned is to turn the pillow so the fattest part is supporting your head while you sleep. It keeps you from getting a painful crick in your neck, and helps you avoid the constant head dropping that happens when you first nod off.

Also, be sure to take along a few Ziploc bags. You’re supposed to use one for your 3-1-1 bag if you fly anyway, but it doesn’t hurt to roll up a few extras and tuck them into your suitcase.

  • Use snack-sized bags to pack your necklaces, one per bag. This prevents tangling.
  • Carry a couple 1-gallon bags to pack wet clothes, muddy shoes, and anything you don’t want contaminating your clean clothes.
  • Tuck an extra quart bag into your toiletries case, in case something happens to your original 3-1-1 bag.

Finally, I always like to take a book. I know, I know, I just got done telling you how to keep your gear charged up, and you could always use a Kindle or even the Kindle app on your phone to read e-books. But there are times that a regular book just feels better. I love the tactile experience, and some books even have that lovely smell that only a book lover can appreciate. Plus, you can read a book on a plane, a book won’t chew up your battery life, and it’s not a devastating loss if you lose a book. Besides, you never want to use your phone to kill a bug you found in your hotel bathroom.

How do you pack for holiday vacations? Where do you go, to visit family or have a family getaway? Share your tips and stories with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Pexels.com (Creative Commons 0)

Go Device-Free On Your Next Vacation

September 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Living down in Orlando, Florida means we see a lot of tourists. A LOT of tourists. And I’ve noticed that, wherever we go, especially to Disney World, people still spend a lot of time staring at their phone and missing out on the fun and joy of the most magical place on Earth!

Parents and kids alike, when they stop for lunch, will spend several minutes swiping, swiping, swiping at their phones, looking at whatever they think is more important than the trip that’s no doubt costing them a few thousand dollars, and they traveled hundreds of miles to get to.

(Of course, you need something to do while waiting in line, so I can’t blame anyone for being bored for a 90-minute wait for Tower Of Terror.)

I’m sure many people are just documenting their times, sharing photos to Instagram and Facebook, telling all their friends what a wonderful time they’re having.

But I want to issue a challenge: The next time you go on vacation, avoid using your phone for as long as you can.

A giant cell phone at the Disney World Pop Century Resort - A great place to try to go device-free for vacation

A giant cell phone at the Disney World Pop Century Resort

Set a No Phones rule for a day or two, and see how it goes. No social media, no texting friends, no checking email, and no pictures (kind of; more on that in a minute). No one can look at their phone for the entire day. And if you really want to commit to it, leave your phones in the hotel.

That doesn’t mean the entire family should be without a phone. At least one adult should carry a phone for emergencies. (And if you really wanted to avoid temptation, get a pay-as-you-go phone only for that purpose.)

Of course, you may want your kids to carry their phones in case they get separated and you need to get in touch with them. Instead, ask them to delete their social media apps (they can easily be downloaded later), and tell them no texting. Have them put their phone in airplane mode, and they won’t be able to receive texts or phone calls from friends.

Make it a challenge. See who can go without checking their phone the longest. I’ve heard of some people who, when they go to lunch together, will stack their phones on the table. The first one to break down and check theirs has to buy lunch for everyone. That includes answering phone calls or responding to the sweet siren song of the text notification.

Sweeten the pot a little bit. Everyone can carry their phone, but the first person to check theirs for any reason (other than checking reservations) has to do a family chore at the end of the day. Or anyone who checks their phone has to put some money into the family kitty, and that’s used to help pay for dinner on the last night out. (And no checking phones during bathroom breaks!)

If you need to take photos, you can carry an inexpensive digital camera (you can get them for less than $100), and just upload the photos when you get back to your hotel that night (assuming you brought a laptop) or when you get back home. Or, if phones are in airplane mode, they can still take pictures.

Finally, there is a question of personal security you should consider. It’s not a good idea to share vacation photos on social media while you’re actually on vacation. You’re essentially telling everyone that you’re not at home, which means your stuff could be stolen while you’re away. So even if you don’t take the no-phone challenge, at least consider refraining from posting vacation photos until you get home.

What are your family rules about mobile phones on vacation? How do you encourage face-to-face communication on vacation? Share your ideas and stories on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Jared (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 2.0)

How to Get Work Done on Vacation

May 24, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A couple weeks ago, I talked about how we shouldn’t work on vacation. That we should actually take the days off that are promised to us by our employers and use that time to recharge our batteries, improve our health, and increase our productivity.

But there will be times that you’re not able to shut yourself completely off while you’re on vacation. It’s not fair and it’s selfish of your employer or your clients to expect you to give up your personal time that is owed to you, but you know what? It’s fine. It’s just. . . fine. It is what it is. This is what you have to work with, so let’s figure out how to make the best of it.

Here are five ways you can continue to work while you’re on vacation even though it’s a terrible practice and your employer should be ashamed of themselves.

(Or if you’re like me and you own your own business, then this is your lot in life. But hey, at least it’s what you love to do.)

A laptop on the beach. Sometimes you may have to work on vacation, so you should at least enjoy yourself.1. Manage expectations early Let people know you’re going on vacation. Set your email auto-responder with a vacation message a week before you leave. This way, people will know you won’t be working 8 – 10 hours a day. Of course, you’ll need to get a lot of work done in advance, but that should free you up enough to only deal with the smaller tasks that pop up.

2. Get into the habit of only checking emails one or two times a day. This is something I’m still working on myself. I try to only check emails in the morning, after lunch, and before 5:00. If I spend all my time dealing with emails like electronic Whack-a-Mole, I won’t actually get any work done. I’m more productive if I only do email a few times a day than if I deal with it all the time. If people get used to me doing it this way, then I can still take the bulk of the day off and deal with things in the morning or evening.

Also, set your auto-responder months in advance to tell people that this is how you work so they don’t get frustrated that you take four hours to respond. This way, you can go out and see some sights without needing to check your email every 20 minutes or worry that you’re going to miss something important. Then, just respond to emails in the morning or at at night.

3. Put all your important documents, reports, spreadsheets in the cloud.
I use Google Drive for my cloud work because I can still access it with an iPad and Bluetooth keyboard. It may not be as fast as a laptop, but if I need to write an article or retrieve some information, I can leave my laptop at home and still function, albeit quite a bit slower. This way, I can deal with emergencies or get some work done during unexpected free time.

4. Figure out how to work with the lightest rig possible
By that, I mean learn how to work with a tablet and a Bluetooth keyboard. I do this anyway
as a backup method in case my computer dies. (I had to do it at the end of April, in fact.) But I also noticed that when I carried my laptop and keyboard, my Tpro Bold II backpack was significantly lighter than when I had my four-pound laptop in it. If you’re worried about keeping your luggage light on your next vacation, this might be a way to go. Plus it keeps your laptop safe at home where it’s not at risk of getting stolen or hacked on a rogue wifi system.

5. See if you can take a longer vacation in exchange for working
Try is to extend your vacation in exchange for being able to work while you’re on it. This could be a compromise with your employer or with your family — I made them a deal that we could take two-week vacations to Florida if I could work a couple days each week, and even a couple hours early in the morning.

We did that for three years before we finally moved here, and it was a nice little arrangement. I worked a couple hours in the morning, a couple at night, and used our rest day to find a coffee shop and work for the day, all using the steps I described above. I still had a lot to catch up on when I got back, but it helped me deal with critical deadlines and deal with problems that arose, and I still got to enjoy some time away from home and the 8- and 10-hour workdays.

How do you work when you’re on vacation? Do you use any special tech or apps to get things done? Share your suggestions and ideas in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Wojciech Kowalski (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 2.0)

Take a Proper Vacation Away From Work

May 10, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

If you’re like most Americans, you don’t actually stop working to take a real vacation. According to a 2017 Forbes article, only 23% of us actually take all of our vacation days. The rest of us only take a little more than half of our eligible days.

And to make matters worse, two-thirds of us actually do work while we’re on vacation.

Stop doing that!

Photo of a laptop on a towel at the beach. This would be the ideal bleisure working vacation!Seriously, people. We are the hardest working, least-vacationing country in the developed world. And we’re so scared of being replaced or laid off that we don’t take the days off that are actually owed to us. Many of us are promised two weeks off of work with full pay, and we don’t take it, thus robbing ourselves of a chance to relax and unwind and enjoy the fruits of our labor.

Some people bank their vacation days so they have a cushion in case they get laid off or fired. Other people are worried that they’re too indispensable. One guy, Jake, said in the Forbes article:

I feel incredibly lucky to lead excellent and competent groups of people, but I don’t ever want to put those I manage in a position where my prolonged absence hinders their day-to-day or makes their lives more difficult.

Let me tell you, if your prolonged absence hinders your staff’s day-to-day lives, you’re a bad manager. Your job is to empower your staff and remove any barriers so they can do their best work. And if your absence hinders their day-to-day work, you haven’t actually empowered them, you’re micromanaging them, and thus, holding them back.

It’s worse for entrepreneurs like me. I’m in a service business that more or less requires me to do stuff nearly every day. I don’t have to go to unnecessary and pointless meetings or any of that corporate nonsense. But I have to send out social media updates and publish articles and do things in real time, or at least on a particular day.

Even so, I still manage to take days off where I don’t do any work. Or I’ll schedule some things that morning and I’m out the door in an hour, visiting one of the theme parks or heading to the beach. Entrepreneurs are terrible at taking time off, so I fight for every day I can get.

We need those days off just to decompress, de-stress, and free our minds of all the clutter and nonsense we have to put up with the other 50 weeks out of the year. Vacations are not only beneficial to your health, including reducing heart disease, and they improve your productivity.

So here are five things you can do to put your mind at ease while you shut your laptop, turn off your phone, and go have fun.

1. Understand this: No one will die if you take some time off. I mean, if you’re a doctor or paramedic, that might actually happen if you skip a shift. But if you make arrangements first, your colleagues will cover you. As for the rest of you, unless you’re working on a project that’s worth hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars, you can sneak out for a few days. Your colleagues functioned just fine before you entered their lives, and they’ll be fine when you’re gone. So they can handle it if you take five days out of the office and never check in.

2. Name an emergency backup in your out of office email reply. In your email auto-response, say that you’re completely cut off for a week, and if there’s an actual emergency, they should contact one of your colleagues. Give their email and phone number. I’ll bet that no one calls them. And if they do, empower your colleague to make a decision on your behalf. Then, return the favor the next time he or she goes on vacation.

3. Take care of all important deadlines before you go. Push the rest off until a week after you get back. Really, how important is your monthly TPS report? Will the company grind to a halt if you don’t turn it in? Probably not. But if you think it will, or if you could get yelled at for being late, send it in a little early. For everything else, just email those people, let them know when you’ll have their deliverables, and put it out of your mind for a week.

4. Leave your phone in the hotel room. Otherwise, you’ll check your email 18 times a day because you want to get a head start. Or people will call you for help. Or you’ll get roped into a conference call. Or someone will need “just one teeny little thing.” If you have to check your email, only do it once at night after you get back to your room.

5. Add an extra day for catch-up time. If you’re going to be gone for a week, block out an extra day in your schedule. Tell people you won’t get back until Tuesday. Then, go to the office and use that free day to catch up on all the emails in your inbox — no meetings, no phone calls, nothing that requires you to do anything except plow through all the junk that accumulated while you were away.

There are very few people who are actually, truly indispensable in their jobs. The rest of the company will run just fine without you. People will understand that you need to take some time off, and hopefully, they’ll leave you alone while you try to relax and spend time with your family. After all, the whole reason we work is so we can care for our families and enjoy our time with them. Your colleagues and clients should respect that and let you have your personal time.

And if they don’t, pester them mercilessly on their own vacation until they get the hint and promise to leave you alone.

How do you shut yourself down from work? Do you take your days off, or do you try to sneak in some work while you’re away? Share your tips and suggestions in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Laura Hoffman (Flickr, Creative Commons)

How to Easily Manage Your Vacation Photos

April 26, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

You want to capture all the great memories from your vacation: the sights you saw, the people you met, the places you ate at. The problem is, thanks to today’s digital cameras and smartphones, you can take literally hundreds of photos over a single week and not know what to do with them all when you’re done.

I had the same problem a few years ago. I used to take a lot of photos and then dump them on my laptop and forget about them for a year until I needed a particular one. Then I would have to wade through them all to find the one I wanted.

Finally, I got smart and developed a quick photo management process that helps me store and find my photos so I can easily find them later. Here are five ways you can easily manage your own vacation photos (or any photos you take).

1. Delete unwanted photos right away

Vacation photo of Epcot during the Flower and Garden Festival in May. One of my favorite times to visit.

Epcot during the Flower and Garden Festival in May 2017

One of the traps I’ve fallen into with a digital camera and a camera phone is that I’m less discerning about what I take and what I keep. I’m old enough to have used a film camera, and when it cost several dollars to get a roll of 24 exposures developed, you had to be more selective of the photos you took.

Compare that to when I was watching the Electric Light Parade at Magic Kingdom a few years ago and I snapped over 200 photos in 30 minutes, or more than 300 photos at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway when I would cover the Indianapolis 500 for my blog. I would take 3, 4, and even 5 photos of the same float/car/person, in case one of them didn’t turn out, and I ended up keeping them all.

So instead, I got into the habit of deleting photos after I took them, when we sat down after a break, or even at the end of the day when I was waiting for my turn in the shower.

Rather than save up a couple thousand digital photos of your trip to Europe, take a few minutes once or twice a day and delete the photos you didn’t like or where someone blinked or the thing you wanted is too small. Then, when you’re sorting through your photos later, you don’t have so many to deal with, and the remaining four tasks are less daunting.

2. Save your photos to the cloud.

I am a big fan of Dropbox and use it for photo storage, although any cloud storage service will work. You can use Google Drive, Apple iCloud, or even Google Photos (formerly Picasa).

I pay for Dropbox’s 1TB storage plan (1 terabyte = 1,024 GB), so I set up my laptop to upload my photos whenever I plug in my phone or digital camera. And every few months, I’ll go through those photos, examine them again more closely, delete any that I don’t want, and rename them and date them — Electric Light Parade 037, 2-12-15 — so I know what they are at a glance. It sure beats trying to figure out what IMG_1482 was supposed to be.

3. Upload photos only on wifi

Try to upload your photos at night when you’re back into the hotel and on the wifi, rather than using your cellular data to do it during the day. While you can certainly have all your photos automatically upload as you take them, you have two issues: 1) you’re uploading every photo you take, including the bad ones, which will chew up your cellular data, and 2) this will run down your battery much faster.

And deleting the photos you don’t want first will also save your storage space, especially if you’re not paying for additional storage space on Dropbox or Google Drive.

4. Centralize your family photos

Depending on how many smartphone users you have, it might be a nice idea to combine your family photos and save them to an album that everyone can access. Whether it’s Google Photos, Instagram, or even Facebook, store the photos and share the link with everyone you’d like to see them.

You can start this by sharing your cloud storage drive (i.e. sharing the Dropbox photo with everyone. Ask everyone to upload their own photos to the drive, and make sure everyone has access.

If you grew up in a family where your folks would invite friends over to see slides of their vacation, you can relive those painful fun experiences again by broadcasting your photos through your TV, especially if you have Apple TV and use Apple’s iCloud, or Google Chromecast and Google Photos. Just make sure you have a comfy couch.

5. Never EVER post vacation photos while you’re on vacation!

I know you want all your friends to see pictures of your feet at the beach or your feet at the swimming pool, but that’s not very safe. For one thing, it tells anyone who sees your photos that you’re not at home. You don’t want to give potential thieves any indication that you’re away, so don’t share vacation photos while you’re on vacation.

Instead, wait until you get home and post them then. You can say things like “Here’s where we were last week” and people will still get the same enjoyment out of them that they would have a week earlier.

I never used to be a big photo taker when I was growing up. But thanks to digital cameras and smartphones, it’s not a problem to snap a quick pic to capture a memory. In fact, I seem to be making up for lost time, taking several hundred pictures every year. After spending many hours trying to sort through an entire year’s worth of photos, I started dealing with them in batches, especially on vacation and Disney visits, as a way to reduce my total workload, and came up with this process. Give it a try the next time you go on vacation and see if you can better manage your on vacation photos.

How do you deal with your vacation photos? Do you have any suggestions or favorite techniques? Share them with us in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Erik Deckers, used with permission

Prepare for a Road Trip With Your Mobile Phone

November 16, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

I’m getting ready to leave for an 7-hour road trip today (Tuesday), from Orlando to Pensacola, so I can read some of my humor columns at their annual Foo Foo Festival. (By the time this publishes, it will be the day of my reading!) I’ve never made the drive, but I’ve traveled I-75 many times, so I know what to expect. But there’s still some planning and preparation I need to make before I head to Pensacola.

1. Figure out what time to leave.

The Waze app shows you the best and fastest routes to take on your road trip.

The Waze app shows you the best and fastest routes to take on your road trip.

I always show up to a conference or event the day before I have to speak, in case something goes wrong en route. But I’m also worried about traffic. I know what time traffic gets heavy around Gainesville, so I need to get through there a couple hours before or after. I use Waze to help me determine the worst times for rush hour traffic and plan accordingly. I also try to leave Orlando before rush hour begins for the same reason.

2. Check the weather on the route.
One year, when I lived in Indianapolis, we were in danger of being iced in 24 hours before we were scheduled to leave for a Florida trip. So we packed up in a hurry and headed out of town, getting about seven hours away and out of the range of the storm. We learned it’s always a good idea to be flexible in our plans if we’re traveling during a particularly harsh weather season. We have always turned to the Weather Channel’s trip planner function that will show you the expected weather along your route. This can let you plan for inclement weather and allow yourself a little extra time, or hunker down in a hotel, during a storm. Weather Underground has a similar trip planner on its website.

3. Pre-plan your stops.
While you don’t need to plan every gas stop and restroom break, you should at least have an idea of when and where you’ll break for meals. Don’t just do the whole fast food drive through thing though. For one thing, that’s a little boring for the palate, but it’s also not as healthy as getting a decent meal at a sit-down restaurant. Plus, the high carbs could make you sleepy in the afternoon. Instead, try some interesting and local restaurants; check out the RoadFood website or TVFoodMaps, an app that shows you all the different places that have been featured on the different TV programs.

4. Include a fun stop or two
There may be a few tourist sites you want to explore on your road trip, so allow yourself some extra road time. I’ve been wanting to see the Lodge cast iron cookware factory near Monteagle, Tennessee for several years, and I’m hoping this time will be my chance to see it. If you don’t have anything planned, leave some extra time anyway, in case you make an unexpected discovery along the way. Whether it’s an outlet mall, museum, or one of those small-town pecan stores — is it “pe-KAHN” or “PEE-cann?” — in Georgia, take a break and enjoy the actual “road” part of your road trip.

5. Entertain yourself

The Overcast app and Decoder Ring Radio Theatre podcasts, one of my favorites on every road trip

The Overcast app and Decoder Ring Radio Theatre podcasts, one of my favorites on every road trip

Normally, I would take a plane instead of making a 7-hour drive, but I have a few reasons for doing so. For one, it’s an issue of price — I’m taking my family, so it’s not an effective use of our money. For another, I enjoy driving, so I always love a good road trip. Plus, I get to catch up on some of my favorite podcasts while everyone else sleeps.

I recommend the Overcast app for podcasts, and the NPR news app for finding local stations along, or just use the NPR One app to listen to public radio news, shows, and podcasts on demand (like Decoder Ring Theatre’s Red Panda audio theater adventures; they produced a few of my radio plays a few years ago). And of course, there are a plethora of music streaming apps — Spotify, Pandora, iTunes Music — to choose from if you don’t like your local radio choices while you’re on the road.

How do you plan for a road trip? Do you plan and map out your route, or just jump in the car and head in that direction, hoping for the best? Share your strategies with us in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit (Waze): Erik Deckers (used with permission)
Photo credit (Overcast): Erik Deckers (used with permission)

How to Avoid Getting Sick on Your Next Vacation

September 14, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

It was certainly a honeymoon to remember, as my new bride and I both got a stomach virus three days into our Disney World trip. As we lay in bed, battling our illness, trying to salvage what was left of our honeymoon, we realized we had been contaminated by someone who attended our wedding. We hugged and kissed so many people that day though, we couldn’t be sure of the guilty party.

(First of all, if you’ve been sick, or you’re fighting an illness, don’t go to a wedding!)

But we could have just as easily gotten sick on that vacation, and as I’ve been traveling more and more, I’m realizing how lucky I’ve been to not get sicker over the years.

So as you start traveling for the fall and winter, here are a few tips for you to remember to avoid getting sick on your next vacation.
Read more

How Waze and Google Maps Work on Your Phone

August 31, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

It was May 2016, and I was on my way to Indianapolis, driving from Orlando. As I was nearing Atlanta, my phone beeped frantically. It was my GPS app, Waze, telling me to exit in a half mile.

I had learned from experience to always follow Waze, so I got over and exited onto some county highway just in time. As I exited, I saw cars stopping on the highway, backing up almost to the exit, the line stretching up as far as I could see

I followed the new directions, driving along county roads east of Atlanta. It took 30 minutes, and Waze finally deposited me back onto the highway, 10 miles north of where I had exited, back into the traffic jam I had left. I was back in the same line of traffic, but only for one mile, and I was only stuck in it for 20 minutes.
Read more

Five Ways to Practice Online Security While on Vacation

February 10, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

One mistake travelers tend to make on vacation is letting their guard down when it comes to cybersecurity. Chances are, our home wifi is already fairly secure, and we feel free to pay our bills and do our banking online without any worry.

So you may think nothing of logging into your bank account and paying a few bills while you’re on vacation, or using your laptop in your hotel room to use Facebook and check emails.

Except public wifi hotspots are risky and unsecured at best. They may even be fake networks set up by hackers looking to break into your laptop. If you’re going to use any electronic devices to go online, it’s strongly advisable to follow a few security rules and use a few security tools to ensure your devices and information remain safe.
Be careful with your electronics when you're on vacation.

1. Be VERY Careful About Strange Wifis

Free hotel, restaurant, and airport wifi networks are notoriously unsecure, and you’re at risk just by logging into one. Never do anything with your finances or share personal information on an unsecure network without a VPN (see below). Even networks that require a password are still not very secure, so additional protection is important.
Read more

Last updated by at .

Next Page »