How to Save Money and Time Attending a Festival in Another City

October 17, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

I recently returned from Lowell, Massachusetts and the Lowell Celebrates Kerouac festival where I was invited to speak and be a special guest at several of the events.

Jack Kerouac, author of the definitive road trip novel On The Road, was born and raised in Lowell. They were commemorating the 50th anniversary of his death on October 21, 1969.

I was fortunate enough to attend and participate in several of the events, which were scattered around the downtown Lowell area. I’ve attended a great number of festivals and conferences, both alone and with my family, and there are a few things I’ve learned over the years.

Whether you’re attending an arts or music festival held in a park, a large film or theater festival scattered around a city, or even a comic book convention in a huge convention center, there are a few things to keep in mind to save plenty of time and money while you’re there

1. Parking will be terrible

Downtown Lowell, Massachusetts, home of the Lowell Celebrates Kerouac Festival

Downtown Lowell, Massachusetts. Jack Kerouac grew up and went to high school a few blocks from here.

Unless you’re an organizer with special parking, or you get to the location super early, you’re not going to find a great place to park. And it’s going to be somewhat expensive. When you’re figuring out your budget for the event, take your parking costs into account. I’ve seen parking go for as much as $40 per day for event parking in big cities. Meanwhile, people will stay in a hotel 10 miles from the event just to save $30 on lodging prices.

If you’re getting a place based on price, look at the price difference between the closer hotel and the cheaper hotel + ride-sharing/parking. You may find that it’s actually cheaper to get the closer, more expensive hotel because you’ll save money on parking or ride-sharing. Plus, you can come and go as you need to, rather than wasting time driving to and from the event.

2. Book your lodging EARLY

Depending on your schedule, you may be on site all day long, so you only need the hotel as a place to keep your stuff and to sleep. If that’s the case, you probably don’t care where you’re located or what kind of room you have. But if you have to show up at the festival really early or are going to stay late, you’ll probably want to be as close as possible to avoid driving time.

The closest hotels always go the fastest, which means you need to book early. In some cases, you may not even want to wait until this year’s festival is over; book now for the next year’s festival and be sure to confirm the reservation a couple of times between now and then.

Also, some events will make arrangements for special event pricing, so be sure to check in with the organizer to see if they’ve set that up.

3. Plan your schedule

Since I was in Lowell as a special speaker, nearly all of my events were already planned for me. I knew where I had to be and when, so I just spent my downtime at some of the other events or working at one of the local coffee shops.

If you’re already a regular calendar user and access it from your mobile phone, book all your events and appointments in your calendar, along with the address and any other necessary information. That way, you don’t need to access the event guide or even use their app.

Scheduling also helps you avoid conflicts and double-booking. Some festivals have multiple events and breakout sessions, others have events in different locations. Check Google Maps to see the distance between all the event venues to make sure you can make it from one to the other in plenty of time. Be sure to include the addresses in your calendar listing, because you can click the address and open up to your favorite GPS app to navigate your way there.

4. Compare the cost of Uber/Lyft versus driving and rental cars.

I think I made a big mistake in Lowell this time: I rented a car and drove everywhere. My rental car costs were $240, plus gas. I rented a car, because the airport is about 30 miles from where I needed to be. However, I think I could have saved about $40 – $50 if I had just used Lyft to go everywhere, even to and from the airport.

You can look up on Lyft and Uber’s website to get trip estimates and compare that with the cost of renting a car and gassing it up before you return it. And if you’re going to be staying in a hotel close to the event, you almost certainly won’t need a rental car, so consider ride-sharing and taxis for any surprise transportation.

5. Carry your own lunch and snacks

Event food is super expensive, although some of it can be pretty fun. I go to the Central Florida Scottish Highland Festival and Games every year, and always love the food trucks they have there. Otherwise, I try to take granola bars and a few sandwiches for a cheap lunch, rather than pay $12 for a burned-yet-still-frozen hamburger and small Coke.

However, don’t cheap out on dinners. Those times should be spent with friends, especially if you only see them at the festivals. Find someplace that’s not too close, but not several miles away either. Walking distance is usually packed with festival-goers and the ones that are far away require a lot of logistical headaches.

How do you travel for festivals and special events? What strategies do you employ to save money? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: John Phelan (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 3.0)

5 Secrets to Traveling in a Big City

September 26, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

I lived for so long in a smallish city, and later in a small town, that when I moved to Indianapolis — a city of roughly 1 million people — it was very stressful to try to find my way around. Even before then, visiting was a real country-mouse-in-the-big-city adventure. But after working and driving around downtown, I got used to the chaos and constant motion going on around me, and I could navigate like a pro.

When I moved to Orlando — 2 million people — I was able to quickly adapt and find my way around, even when the city was at its busiest. Central Florida gets roughly 60 million visitors per year, which can make getting around rather nerve wracking, but the residents learn to take it all in stride.

But when I was recently in Washington DC, a city with some of the worst traffic in the entire country, I knew better than to try to navigate my way around by myself. I typically won’t do it unless I’m going to be there for a few days and I have time to figure it out, or if I’m going to be in a lot of different places all over the city.

If you’re traveling to a big city and you’re not used to it, here are a few ways you can function and get around without pulling your hair out.

1. Know that parking will be expensive.

Free parking in the big cities is about as rare as a singing unicorn. And when you do find public parking, you can bet that the parking prices will be sky high. When I was in Chicago 10 years ago, daytime parking was $50 for 8 AM – 5 PM.

There’s a very good chance you’re going to have to pay for parking at your hotel too. My Washington DC hotel charged $50 per night for parking, but it was worth it because I didn’t want to park in a public garage. They also let me leave my car there until 3 pm, which meant I didn’t have to take it with me and fight for parking at my last appointment.

If you’re staying in the city, research parking options before you even get there. Make sure your hotel has it, and consider long-term parking in a different location, like an airport, and then taking public transportation to your hotel.

2. Pick a hotel based on location, not price.

Traffic is always a big problem when traveling to a big city.When you stay in a new city, there’s going to be a lot of temptation to pick the cheapest hotel, especially if you’re trying to stay brand loyal. The problem is the cheap hotels are nowhere near the good locations; you’re going to pay a little more for easy access.

Several years ago, my father-in-law traveled to a trade show in Atlanta and stayed in a hotel his company picked for him and the company executives because it was $20 per night cheaper than the hotel right next to the convention center. The executives swore they would never stay that far from downtown again after they spent $40 per day in taxis and had to sit in rush hour traffic for an hour each way.

You may save money by getting a cheaper hotel, but you’ll end up being so far away, you’ll spend all those savings in ride sharing, taxis, or parking. Not to mention, you’ll be up to 60 minutes away from your destination, which is going to put a serious crimp in your travel plans.

3. Study maps and GPS apps before you go.

Whenever I go to a new city, I plan out for the places I want to go: the restaurants, coffee shops, meeting sites, and other attractions. I’ll even start planning before I’ve booked my hotel so I can make the best choice. However, I’ve learned I don’t really understand the city and the traffic patterns until I get there and can actually see what the city is like.

For example, I once traveled to Boston and got a hotel that I thought was easy walking distance to a conference center. And it was, as long as I didn’t mind walking along a five-lane parkway with no sidewalks. That didn’t show up on Google Maps, and I didn’t realize it until I got there.

4. Leave plenty of time to get where you’re going.

One thing you can count on in big cities is that there will always be traffic jams. You could have a traffic jam on I-4 in Orlando at 2:00 AM. (Trust me, I know.) And you could get stuck in major traffic, even traveling around the downtown area in the middle of the ay.

So check out the traffic conditions on Waze before you head out to your events to see if you need to add a little more travel time. Do the same if you’re using a ride sharing service, because they’ll be stuck in the same traffic. However, they also know the city better than you, so they’ll know the side streets to duck down to avoid the worst of it.

5. Use ride sharing or taxis

I’ve been to Washington DC twice in the last six months, and I can tell you that the smartest thing I did was to leave my car in the parking lot and take a Lyft everywhere. I was already paying for my parking but the cost of traveling everywhere on Lyft — $9 – $12 per trip — was less than I would have spent to park somewhere else.

And even if the ride sharing would have cost a little more, it was worth it to not have to drive around and around and around trying to find a parking space even remotely close to the place I needed to be. That would have added time to the actual commute time, not to mention the extra minutes spent walking from my car to the destination. And if it had been raining or beastly hot, that would have just been worse. At least with Lyft, I was able to go from door to door to wherever I needed to be.

What are your travel strategies when you’re in a big city, especially a new one? How do you find your way around? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: FrTed (Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0)

Five Reasons to Take a Fall Vacation

September 12, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Now that summer is over and the kids are back in school, this is the best time to start thinking about a fall vacation. But it doesn’t have to be a two-week trek to a whole different part of the world: Micro-cations are the new trend, so you could spend 3 – 4 days (a long weekend, really) and lay back and relax.

Maybe you can take a few days this October or November and spend it in a new city, enjoying the fall colors and cooler temperatures. Or if you live in Florida, you can head to the theme parks or the beach and enjoy the fact that the crowds have all gone back home.

Here are five reasons you should take a fall vacation (or micro-cation) for a few days.

1. The prices are lower for hotels and airfare.

Now that the peak travel season is over, the prices are lower for most vacation costs. You can get an airplane ticket for less than the summer prices, and your hotel costs are lower as well. This means you can stay an extra day, stay in a normally-more expensive hotel, or even fly at a more convenient time for the same amount you would have spent in the summer.

2. Fall vacation crowds are smaller.

Mackinac Island is a great place for a fall vacation.One of the best time to hit the Florida theme parks are right after school has started: all the kids are back in school, which means most corporate vacation seasons are also over. That means a smaller crowd inside the kid-friendly places. I can tell you that Wednesdays in October are thoroughly enjoyable in the Orlando theme parks.

It’s the same in all the other vacation attractions around the country: Museums tend to be a little less crowded, as are restaurants, sightseeing tours, and other tourist attractions. Lines and wait times are shorter and you can often get reservations at that hotel or restaurant you’ve been dying to try.

3. The temperature is more enjoyable.

Summers are plenty hot, which makes going outside a bit of a challenge. You have to stay plenty hydrated, and sometimes your day is just spent walking from shady spot to shady spot or spending the entire day inside for the air conditioning.

In the fall, the temperatures have cooled to a more manageable level, and you only have to put on a light sweater or even a sweatshirt to deal with the cooler days. It’s not so cold you have to wear a parka and mittens, so you can still enjoy your time outside.

4. There’s a bigger emphasis on relaxing.

When I was a kid, summer vacations were always about going somewhere and doing something. Even when we vacationed in Florida, we were always on the go. A day at the beach was hardly relaxing, because we had to drive there, fight for a spot in the sand, complain about the heat, wait in line for snacks, wait for a table at restaurants, and then whine about the sunburns and sand in our swimsuits. It wasn’t that fun, frankly.

With a fall vacation, I always feel more relaxed. Maybe it’s something about the lower temperatures, but it always makes me slow down. I’m more interested in going for a walk, especially in the woods. I can hang out, meander around a new city, or drive around and look at the leaves. Fall is more about seeing and enjoying, not rushing and doing.

5. It’s the last chance for a breather before the holidays.

Most of us have hectic, chaotic holiday seasons coming up: there are the different office parties, friends’ parties, and various different parties, shopping, and kids’ events you’ve got to attend. You can easily get overwhelmed with everything you have to do.

A fall vacation is the last chance to relax before the busy holidays begin, starting a week or two before Thanksgiving, and not ending until after the new year. Take a break at the end of October or early November, and spend a few days relaxing and taking it easy while you still can. That way, you won’t feel so wound up from summer vacation just as you start the silly season.

Are you going to take a fall vacation? Have you taken any, or would you take one? If you’re taking one this year, what are your plans? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Michael Sprague (Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0)

Things You SHOULD Buy Before You Travel

June 27, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

While there are many things you can probably go without when you travel — miniature sleep tents for airplanes, battery-powered neck-warming pillows, airplane bathrobes — there are a few things you should have.

Smarter Travel recently published an article on seven things you shouldn’t buy before you travel, and I found myself disagreeing with about half of their items. The list includes:

  1. Travel insurance
  2. Private Passport Expediting Service
  3. Seat Assignment
  4. Prepaid Credit Cards
  5. Platinum-Economy Seat Upgrades
  6. TV Show Downloads
  7. Expedited Security

As a former road warrior turned frequent road tripper and couple-times-a-year flier, I think you’re making a big mistake if you follow this advice. There are a few items I absolutely insist on getting, and a couple items I could go either way. And, of course, there are some you should absolutely never, ever pay for. Ever.

To start with, I agree, you should not pay for private passport expediting services. You’re basically paying someone else to fill out a form and/or stand in line for you. You can pay for expedited service from the State Department anyway, which is what the private services are going to do. You can also get “life or death emergency” passport services. If you can do it yourself, do you really need to pay a few hundred dollars for someone else to do it?

I also agree you shouldn’t pay for TV show downloads, unless you’re already doing it. Download Netflix or Hulu episodes if you’re a subscriber (that’s included in your subscription), but don’t buy new episodes just for a trip. You’ve probably had plenty of items on your Netflix watchlist for many months if not years, so watch some of those. Save the purchased episodes for when you get home.

Skip prepaid credit cards, unless you can’t get your own credit cards. You should instead get credit cards that give you travel miles, so you can help pay for your next trip.

And the seat assignment thing is a little iffy. If you check in immediately 24 hours before your flight — like, right at 23:59:59 before you leave — you could probably get a good seat. However, just remember that there are people like me who purchase the Platinum-Economy Seat Upgrade, and I can reserve my seat when I book my ticket two months in advance. But if you’re on a less-popular flight or route, you’ll probably be okay.

You Should Absolutely Get These Before You Travel

However, I think you should get these things before you travel, especially if you fly more than once a year. (There are a few exceptions for each of these though.)

1. Buy travel insurance if you’re going on an expensive trip.
I don’t always get travel insurance, but there are plenty of times that I do. If nothing else, your travel insurance is going to help pay for any and all lost pre-paid tickets if you ever have to cancel or cut short a trip because of weather or illness.

Imagine saving up for a family vacation and canceling all those non-refundable airline tickets because someone got the flu two days before the flight. Sure you can recover or postpone the park/cruise/adventure tickets, but it’s a lot of hassle and time, not to mention the loss of any nonrefundable fees. Travel insurance can help you avoid all those headaches, and it’s not that expensive.

Check the different travel insurance options — and make sure you know what they cover and don’t cover beforehand — before you book your first ticket.

2. Get the platinum-economy seat upgrades.
As I’ve said before, I’m bigger than average. I need more legroom, but I don’t want to upgrade to business class. The Economy Plus (or whatever each airline calls it) is completely worth the extra costs.

The difference in seat pitch between Economy and Economy Plus may only be a couple of inches, but those couple inches mean the world of difference to me. I’ve spent two hours with my knees jammed up against the back of a seat, and I’ll change my entire itinerary before I ever do that again.

3. Pay for expedited security.

TSA security line at Denver International Airport

TSA security line at Denver International Airport

As the Smarter Travel article said:

Expedited security can be a really awesome perk when you’re faced with a lengthy line that snakes off into the distance. On the other hand, when there are three other people in line and the sound of crickets in the air, it can feel like a rip-off.

Even if you only fly once a year, expedited security is totally worth it. The cost for TSA PreCheck is $85 and it lasts for 5 years: $85 ÷ 5 = $17.

So your cost for having PreCheck is $17 per year. For a round-trip flight, that works out to $8.50 per trip. Would you pay $8.50 to not have to stand in line at security? I would.

I can tell you that never-have-I-ever been in a security line with only three people in it, but I’ve been in plenty of lines that snake off into the distance before. And there are some days where I would just pay 85 bucks to skip that line, let alone have five years’ worth of skipping.

If you’re a very infrequent traveler, or you’re small enough to fit into the regular economy seats, maybe you can skip these three “should buys,” but for the most part, I always recommend them to anyone who’s average height or above and flies at least once a year. Otherwise, take a good, long look at what you’re giving up, and see if the gains make up the possible headaches that will arise if something goes wrong.

What kind of “must haves” do you get before you travel? Are there any we can skip or items we should never leave the house without? Share your tips on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

Five Things to Know About Your Next Rental Car

June 11, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

I don’t travel that often anymore, but I’ve created a new rule for myself: If I have to go 800 miles or less, I’ll drive rather than fly. And I’ll get a rental car to boot.

I don’t mind the time spent on the road by myself — I look forward to it, if I’m being honest. I get to listen to podcasts, make phone calls, and see parts of the country I usually don’t get to see.

And even if I flew, I would probably need a rental car anyway just to get around. So I can either buy a plane ticket for $400+ on top of the rental car fee, or I can just rent the car.

I’ve rented enough cars to know some of the tricks to getting a good deal and avoiding some of the traps that seem to befall renters. Here are five things you should know before you rent your next car.

1. You PROBABLY Don’t Need Their Insurance

Rental car parkCar companies will always try to sell you their additional insurance, but there’s a very good chance that you don’t need it. For $10 – $30 per day, you can pay for the insurance in case the unthinkable happens. This can also cover you against dings and dents that might come up, as well as more serious accidents you’re involved in.

However, your own car insurance may cover this for you, so speak to your insurance agent to make sure. Additionally, some credit cards will also cover rental cars for you, as long as you rent that car with that card. Again, check this out before you book your rental.

2. Fill up before you return the car.

If you turn in your rental car without any gas, or with less gas than when you left, you’ll pay a hefty refueling charge. So the rental car companies will sometimes sell you pre-paid gas, which covers their time and costs in filling the tank for you. The problem is, it can be anywhere from $.50 – $1.50 more than normal gas prices.

So whatever you do, make sure you fill up before you return your car. If you’re not sure about how to find nearby gas stations, check Google Maps before you even get there. Then drive by on the way out so you can see where it’s located compared to the pickup location. Set it as a favorite in Waze or your GPS app so it’s easy to find later.

Also, keep in mind that some gas stations closest to an airport will also charge more than normal street pricing, so use an app like Gas Buddy or Waze to find the best prices.

3. Watch out for hidden fees

Rental companies will hit you with hidden fees if you’re not careful. Here are a few to watch out for.

  • Mileage: Most rental companies offer unlimited mileage, but that may change if you leave the state or region. Others will only give you a daily allotment, and charge you if you go over.
  • Airport concession: This is a fee that airports charge car rental companies to be able to operate there. If you’re renting a car from your hometown, don’t go to the airport to pick up your car. Do some comparison shopping to make sure.
  • Additional drivers: Some companies will charge you if you have additional drivers, but places like Enterprise and Avis let spouses and domestic partners be added at no extra cost.
  • Frequent flier fees: If you want to apply your rental miles to frequent flier miles instead, you may be charged a small administrative fee.
  • Extra features: Things like a roof rack, GPS, satellite radio, and child seats all cost extra, so if you don’t need them, don’t get them. Download the TuneIn app and Waze to your mobile phone and you can get Internet radio stations (I love WFPK out of Louisville), and Waze is a superior GPS option.

4. Take advantage of upgrade offers.

One of the nice things about renting cars is that you can get a different car than your usual one. I owned a Kia Rio 5 for 12 years, which is a good little car, but it’s not as comfortable for 1,000-mile trips as you would hope. (Trust me on this!) So when I rent a car, I often get a standard or full-size car just for the extra room and comfort.

There were a few times I would get bumped up to the next level — say from intermediate to full-size — because the rental agency was out of the model I requested. If that happens to you, the agency won’t charge you any more, so take advantage of it when the chance arises.

Make sure you pay attention to the gas mileage of your upgrades though. I was once upgraded from a Ford Fusion to a Jeep Wrangler. It was pretty cool because I’ve always wanted a Jeep and this was my chance to pretend for a weekend. However, my gas costs literally doubled because the gas mileage was half of what the Fusion was supposed to be. So, the upgrade hurt a little too.

5. Make a thorough inspection of the rental car before you leave and when you return

Remember, you’re on the hook for any dings and dents that happen to the car. The agent will undoubtedly make an inspection of the car, so be sure to walk with them around the car. Take note of any blemishes you find, and make sure the agent marks it in their rental report. Take photos with your own phone just to be sure.

You don’t want to be blamed for a ding or dent that was already there when you pulled out of the garage, so make sure you know exactly what’s already been done to the car before you leave.

When you return, inspect the car again and take a video in case there are any disputes about its condition. This is especially important if you’re returning the car at a time or place where there’s no agent present. If there’s damage later, even after you turned it in, and they try to blame you, it’s completely your word against theirs.

Are you a regular renter? What rental car tips would you share with other travelers? Share them with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

Photo credit: cool3g (Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain)

Five Summer Road Trip Planning Secrets

May 30, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

We just finished Memorial Day weekend and the unofficial start to summer. That means several weeks of travel getaways, whether it’s a weekend out of town or a couple weeks at the beach.

If you’re taking a summer road trip out of town this summer, here are a few things you need to remember. Whether you’re hanging out by the pool, on the beach, or even your kid’s tournament, whether you’re going for a day or a few weeks, here are five things to remember before you leave.

1. Get a car checkup before you leave.

You need to prepare your care for your next summer road trip.Your car can most likely handle whatever city driving you’re going to throw at it, but a 500-mile summer road trip could push it to its limits. Make sure you get the oil changed, the fluids topped off, the tires and spare are properly inflated, the filters have been changed, and that the AC is fully functional.

You may even want to get a wheel alignment since misaligned wheels can eat into your car’s fuel efficiency. Plus, the cost of repairing a breakdown could wreck your entire vacation budget if you break something you weren’t planning on.

If you’re not sure about whether your car can make a long summer road trip, consider renting a car instead. You won’t put the wear and tear on your car, and you can have a brand new one in excellent working condition. The AC will work, you’ll have a lot of the latest features and advances (like a touchscreen display that connects to your mobile phone), and you could even have roadside coverage depending on your rental agency.

2. Take plenty of water with you.

Don’t just plan on stopping for water and beverages during regular stops. For one thing, gas station water costs 2 – 4 times more than the grocery store. Pack a small cooler with a few bottles and keep them in the car with you. If nothing else, they’ll help you out if you have a breakdown or have to spend several hours walking around during the day.

Be sure to take water with you on your outdoor excursions too. As summers are getting hotter and hotter — we hit 95 in Central Florida on Memorial Day Monday — you’re more likely to get dehydrated and suffer the ill effects. So drink up and stay hydrated. Drink more than you think you need rather than thinking you can go without.

3. Be sure to wear sunscreen and sun protection.

If you’re going to be outside for more than 30 minutes, rub sunscreen on exposed areas, including your face and your neck. Look for a high SPF rating and something that’s waterproof and sweat proof.

Don’t forget sunglasses or eye protection. You can also use a hat to shade your eyes and face from the sun (a big floppy hat will cover up a lot more than a baseball cap). And remember, if you’re out on a boat this summer, the reflection of the water can also cause sunburns. So don’t assume your hat is giving you enough protection — you’re getting the bounce back off the water’s surface, so you still need sunscreen.

Don’t worry about a quick trip to the mailbox or from the car to your next stop though — store, restaurant, movie theater. You don’t need to break out the parasol and long sleeves for that. Just take precautions and be careful if you’re going to have prolonged exposure to the sun.

4. Check the weather forecast and know what’s typical for the area.

Use your favorite weather app to determine the weather during your travel dates. Of course, you can’t know what the weather is going to be like six weeks into the future, but you can get a good idea of what it will be like three days before you leave. There are a few travel planners on sites like Accuweather.com, the Weather On Wheels app, and the Weather Network.

Similarly, check out the historical weather patterns for the area, or even better, call a local. If you’re staying at a hotel, call the front desk or concierge and ask them the seasonal weather is usually like. For example, Indiana doesn’t get terribly hot until July and August, and it rarely rains. On the other hand, that’s Central Florida’s rainy season: Not only is it terribly hot, but it rains nearly every single day between 12:00 noon – 3:00 pm.

This means if you’re visiting any of the theme parks, book your lunch around 1:00 pm and don’t let the rain chase you out. Let everyone else leave and the park will be a little emptier for the afternoon and evening.

5. Leave extra time to arrive.

I’ll be honest, I hate traveling over the summer. Everyone is out, they’re hot and sweating and irritable, and there are traffic jams and lines everywhere, so tempers run short. It’s worse when you’re planning on getting somewhere at a certain time, only to find the route is jammed up and you’re not sure if you’re ever going to get there, let alone get there on time.

The general rule of summer driving is to assume that traffic delays will happen and that there’s nothing you can do to make them go faster. But you can plan for them and even avoid them.

If you’re not familiar with an area, study a map before you get there. Find out where the main through streets, bypasses, and known-only-to-local routes are.

Make sure you have Waze installed on your phone, and preprogram some of your destinations (like restaurant reservations) into your Favorites section. You can even preprogram your arrival times, and Waze will calculate your departure time based on historic traffic patterns. And if something pops up, like an unexpected traffic delay, you’ll be alerted about a new time to depart.

How do you prepare for your summer road trip? Do you have any recommendations for your fellow travelers? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

Photo credit: tbarcturus (Pixabay.com, Creative Commons 0)

Five Things to Listen to That Aren’t Music On Your Next Trip

April 25, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

If you’ve ever been on a trip and wanted to listen to something else other than music, you would find there are quite a few options available if you only knew where to look. Maybe you’re a fan of podcasts or audiobooks, maybe you want something more like a movie for your mind, or maybe you’d like to hear what’s happening in another part of the world.

If you’re looking for something other than music, and you want to be informed, entertained, or educated, there are several options for you to try. And whether you’re traveling by yourself or with your family, there’s something for everyone to enjoy. Here are a few of the options I use whenever I’m on the road.

1. Listen to News From Another Country

Sure, sure, you can listen to your local news, and you should do that anyway. It’s always good to be informed about what’s happening close to home. But it’s sometimes interesting to hear what other countries are saying about what’s happening over here. And it’s especially interesting to hear what kinds of issues are affecting those countries.

For example, I like to listen to the CBC and BBC via their apps or the TuneIn app. It lets me hear about their local issues, as well as some of the global news we never hear at home.

I also have a Canadian podcast I listen to called CANADALAND (they capitalize it that way, not me!), which covers not only Canadian media criticism but a lot of their local issues affecting different provinces and cities. It’s interesting to have some insider knowledge about a different country, and I’ve had some great conversations with several Canadians about what’s happening back home.

2. Podcasts

I’m a regular podcast listener because I like it better than most commercial radio these days. I have about 12 – 15 podcasts I listen to every week. There are a few general interest podcasts, like Alec Baldwin’s Here’s The Thing, Broken Record With Malcolm Gladwell, and David Tennant’s aptly-named podcast, David Tennant Does A Podcast.

As a writer, I also have some writing specific podcasts I never miss, like Jeff Pearlman’s Two Writers Slinging Yang, Grammar Girl, and The Downtown Writers Jam With Brad King.

Whatever your job, hobby, or side hustle happens to be, I can almost guarantee there’s a podcast about it. Just find your favorite podcast app — I prefer Overcast, but Stitcher has a premium model that gives you extra content — and pick a few podcasts to start listening to. Don’t feel like you have to listen to every episode all the way through — fast forward or just delete and move on. Try out new shows and find what you lie as you settle into an easy-to-manage routine. That way, when you’re heading out on your trip, you’ve got a small bank of episodes saved up and ready to work through.

3. Audiobooks

The audiobook industry is a billion dollar industry, and is a great way to read books without actually reading them. You can borrow CDs from your library, download electronic resources from the same library (get the Hoopla or OverDrive app; ask your librarian if you’re not sure how to use it), or download thousands of free audiobooks through services like LibriVox.

And you can also download the latest books through Amazon’s Audible, a service that lets you download three titles each month. The first month is free, and then you pay $14.99 each month thereafter. If you’re leaving on a trip soon, take it for a test drive and decide whether to keep it right after your trip ends.

4. Audio Drama

This used to be called “radio theatre” (note the -re, which means it’s fancy), but now it’s called audio drama because it’s rarely heard on the radio. it doesn’t matter what you call it though, because there are literally tens of thousands of hours of content available on the Internet, most of it for free.

The Overcast app and Decoder Ring Radio Theatre podcasts, one of my favorites on every road trip. Consider this for your next trip.

The Overcast app and Decoder Ring Radio Theatre podcasts, one of my favorites on every road trip

A lot of it comes in the form of new podcasts, like one of my favorites, Decoder Ring Theatre (which produced several of my plays nearly seven years ago), Girl In Space by Sarah Werner, and the wonderful The Orbiting Human Circus.

There’s also plenty of OTR (old-time radio) you can download, like Great OTR, a website run by a friend of mine.And nearly all of the OTR content online is free to download: Just Google “free old-time radio” and you’ll be shown thousands of hours of free old radio shows, from comedies to mysteries to science fiction to police drama.

Download them to your hard drive and load them to your favorite MP3 player., or save them to Dropbox, and then use an app like Cloudbeats to listen to the files directly from Dropbox. (Make sure you set this up before you leave on your trip though.)

5. Stand-Up Comedy

My wife and kids love listening to stand-up in the car. They’ll turn on Pandora or YouTube Radio, select a favorite comic, and then hit play. Since most of these comics’ acts have been released as albums broken down into tracks, the algorithms will generate random playlists of similar comics and take them through a plethora of comics and their work, just like if you started listening to one song from a favorite artist.

It’s a great way to find new comics, stumble on some old favorites, and turn the trip into a series of hilarious surprises. My family will reach the end of a two-hour trip and not want to get out of the car once they arrive, because they’re waiting to finish just one more routine.

(Be careful listening with little kids in the car: some comics are not suitable for children, and given the random nature of their work, you may find yourself quickly fumbling for the Next button.)

What do you listen to when you’re not listening to music? What are some must-hear programs and podcasts? Share your suggestions with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

Five Lessons Learned on a Multi-Stop Road Trip

April 11, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Taking a road trip that lasts several days brings challenges and special problems, but they’re not that hard. Even if it’s just a one-day drive, it’s fairly straightforward: Drive to the place, stop a few times for a break, spend your time there, and drive back.

You’ll want to pre-plan your route and some of your stops, of course, as well as any hotel reservations, but the journey can be simple enough thanks to Google Maps and Waze.

But a multi-stop road trip has a few extra issues that can vastly complicate things. Staying in multiple cities and hotels, meeting with different people, going to different events — there are a lot more moving parts that can make your trip a bit difficult.

I recently finished up a week-long speaking tour that had me in Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. I drove from Orlando, stayed in the different cities where I was speaking, and would drive to the next city as soon as I was done. That way, I woke up in the next city, rather than in the old one.

When it was done, I drove over 2,000 miles, visited five different cities, and gave 13 different talks. These are the lessons I learned.

1. Rent a car.

If you’ve got an older car, or it’s a little small for a big trip, consider renting a car instead of cramming everyone into yours. This is especially helpful if you’re taking a much longer trip and don’t want to put all the mileage on your car. My trip was over 2,000 miles and while I’m hoping to get 300,000 miles out my car, I didn’t want to put that many on in one week.

You may even want to get a slightly bigger car than you have so you can be a little more comfortable. But if you’re driving a thousand miles or more, don’t ignore the gas mileage. I made the mistake once of accepting an upgrade to a Jeep Wrangler for an 800-mile trip, even though I had requested a Nissan. The gas mileage on the Jeep was half of the Nissan, and so my gas costs doubled.

Also, don’t let them talk you into the GPS option since you’ve got one on your phone. You can also skip the Sirius-XM radio and listen to podcasts or even subscribe to the Sirius-XM service for a month. Get some kind of temporary dashboard mount for your phone and keep your GPS on at all times. Just don’t forget to take it with you when you return the car.

2. Put your destinations in your calendar.

Somewhere in Tennessee. Be sure to stop and look around on your next road trip.

Somewhere in Tennessee. Be sure to stop and look around on your next road trip.

I did a little overkill on my planning here: I blocked off all my actual speaking appointments and created appointments for the drives to the destinations. That way, I could put in each address of each appointment. I even did this for my car rental and hotel stays in the calendar and included the confirmation numbers in the notes section.

That’s because I can set my iPhone’s default map app for Apple Maps, Google Maps, or Waze. I use Waze all the time, so that’s my default. Whenever I open a calendar appointment, I can tap the location, and Waze will open and find the route to my destination. I don’t have to search for the address and type it into the search bar. It’s especially useful if I’m in a hurry later.

(To set your default map, open your Google Calendar, open the Settings, and open Apps from Google. You’ll find it there.)

3. Set planned drives, and turn on the Tell Me When to Leave function.

You can also save some time if you schedule all your drives in Waze. You’ll start by entering the address of your destination and then the day and time you want to leave or arrive. Then, as you get into your car for the next leg of the trip, open Waze, pull up the Planned Drives list, and tap your next destination. You can even connect your calendar so you’re automatically notified when it’s time to leave based on the current and expected traffic patterns. (Do this in Waze’s settings.)

A few days before you leave, set up all your Waze preferences too, including favorite gas station brands, whether to avoid tolls and highways, and even the kinds of alerts you want to hear.

Otherwise, if you’re running your sound through your car stereo, Waze can get annoying as it tells you about every pothole and car on the side of the road. You can turn off individual alerts under the Alerts & Reports settings. I turned most of mine off, only keeping on the police alerts.

4. Take a laundry bag.

In the past, when I’ve taken long trips, it’s always been easier because I just unpack and put dirty clothes into my empty suitcase. (Of course, I keep them folded so I can fit everything back in again.) Then, when it’s time to leave, I don’t have to track everything down.

This time, moving from place to place, I kept everything in my bag, but I realized on Day 2 that I didn’t want to root through dirty clothes to find a clean pair of socks. So I stuffed my dirty laundry into a plastic shopping bag. It certainly made finding clean clothes easier, my suitcase got lighter every day, and I kept the laundry bag in the car.

5. Keep the car clean.

One very important lesson I learned a long time ago was the importance of a clean car or a clean office. As Anthony Bourdain stressed over and over in Kitchen Confidential, if you have a messy mise-en-place (“meez on ploss”), you can’t find anything and your brain can’t function properly. It can increase your stress level, which can make an already stressful situation worse.

As Bourdain said in his book,

If you let your mise-en-place run down, get dirty and disorganized, you’ll quickly find yourself spinning in place and calling for backup. I worked with a chef who used to step behind the line to a dirty cook’s station in the middle of a rush to explain why the offending cook was falling behind. He’d press his palm down on the cutting board, which was littered with peppercorns, spattered sauce, bits of parsley, bread crumbs and the usual flotsam and jetsam that accumulates quickly on a station if not constantly wiped away with a moist side towel. “You see this?” he’d inquire, raising his palm so that the cook could see the bits of dirt and scraps sticking to his chef’s palm. “That’s what the inside of your head looks like now.”

It’s so easy to just let the fast food sacks, empty cups and bottles, and snack wrappers pile up, throwing them into a foot well. And if you’re traveling with kids, it’s like the few toys and games they brought multiplied exponentially, and now the car is messier than their rooms.

Make it a habit to always through away your trash at every stop. Dump out all the cups and bottles, even if you stop just for a quick fill-up. Keep your kids’ toys and games in a bag and stow it in the trunk. Only give them one item for each leg of the trip. When they get tired of it, switch it out for another item once you stop again. Don’t just keep the bag in the front passenger seat, because then their stuff is cluttering up your own foot space, and it can be uncomfortable.

I took a solo 2,000-mile trip, and I actually had a good time. I enjoyed my time in the car, caught up on all my podcasts, and even enjoyed a few new ones. I made it to my destinations, was able to navigate easily, and it could not have been more smooth. It makes me want to do another tour in a few months.

How do you handle long road trips with many stops? If you’re a traveling salesperson or consultant, how do you navigate between destinations? Share your ideas with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream, and be sure to connect with us on Instagram.

Photo credit: Erik Deckers (Used with permission)

Planning and Packing Tips for Your Family’s Spring Break Trip

January 17, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Spring break is coming up in a few months, which doesn’t seem possible, since we just finished with [insert preferred winter holiday here]. But Spring Break happens in March and April for most of the country, and many families plan some sort of out-of-town trip for that time period.

If you’re heading somewhere warm, like down here in Florida (or over in Texas, Arizona, and California), there are a few planning and packing tips you should plan on (and a few you should avoid) as you’re preparing for your next vacation.

One of our packing tips is to not overpack your car; ship things ahead if you need to, or buy items when you arrive.

  1. Avoid the college crowds. Some families make a mistake venturing into the college spring break destinations — Panama City Beach, Miami, Daytona Beach, etc. — not realizing how much they’re going to have to explain to their young children. Plus, these places will be so packed that you’ll have a tough time finding a place to stay, and everything will be very expensive. Keep in mind that many of the popular destinations — Disney World, Disneyland, most beaches, etc. — will be super packed too.
  2. Don’t pack your pool toys. If you want to get your kids a bunch of pool toys, bucket and shovels, and so on, wait until you get to your destination. There’s no point in packing something you can easily get at any drugstore or Walmart (we have those here in Florida). Save your luggage space and weight. In fact, consider leaving them behind when you go home. They’re cheap to buy and easy to replace, and unless you have a pool at home, you’re not going to use them for several months anyway.
  3. Don’t pack baby food and diapers. Again, we have baby food and diapers for sale down here. I’ve seen parents of babies pack an entire week’s worth of diapers in their own suitcase, only to discover their hotel is literally two blocks from a grocery store. Since extra bag fees can be as much as $50 per bag, you’d be money ahead if you just shipped the diapers. So avoid the hassle altogether and just buy the diapers once you arrive.
  4. If you fly, leave on a Friday and return on a Sunday. Flights are cheaper if you can leave on a Friday and/or return on a Sunday. So if you’re spending a whole week on vacation, make it a 10-day trip and get the lowest possible price for the time out.
  5. If you drive, leave in the middle of the night. The south-bound highways are packed on Friday and Saturday before Spring Break, and the northbound lanes are packed on Sundays. You can avoid a lot of that traffic if you leave at 3:00 in the morning. We did this for years when we drove from Indianapolis to Florida, and we saved ourselves so many headaches. Also, use the Waze app on your mobile phone to get up-to-the-minute traffic alerts.
  6. Make dinner reservations right now. If you’re staying in a Spring Break hotspot, and there are some great restaurants you want to try, book the reservations now because they’ll be gone by your vacation. If you’re not sure what you’re in the mood for, book a couple restaurants for the same night and then cancel the others a couple days beforehand, once you make up your mind. (But don’t just fail to show up. That’s inconsiderate and rude.)
  7. Avoid the clichéd destinations. Of course, the temptation is to leave the northern states and head south for warmer weather. And since it’s the middle of January, you’re probably looking at us here in Florida, wishing a January blizzard on us. (Don’t worry; we make up for it with furnace-like summers.) But Spring Break in Florida is packed! Head to a less-traditional Spring Break destination — Atlanta, GA; Savannah, GA; Charleston, SC — and skip the crowds, but enjoy the warmer weather.
  8. Protect your money. Never carry all your money in one place, and never show it all when you pay for something. Carry only one or two credit cards at all times, so if you lose one, you can still operate with another you hid in your suitcase or the hotel safe.
  9. Don’t tell social media you’re on vacation. Posting photos of your vacation only tells crooks that your house is empty, as well as your whereabouts. Thieves and other criminals browse social media for check-ins, photos, and notices that people are either not at home, or are at places not familiar to them. Save the photos for when you get home.
  10. Get travel insurance. You may only be taking a relaxing vacation at the beach to read books, but that doesn’t mean things can’t go wrong. You can get sick or injured and get hit with unexpected medical costs or miss out on tickets and reservations you already paid for. Get insurance that will cover medical costs and replacement costs for reservations.

Where do you go for Spring Break? What kinds of packing tips do you have for those of us who will be heading out for a much-needed respite from winter weather? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Five Tips to Help You Travel With Friends and Family

December 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Working in my wife’s family business saw us frequently traveling together, whether it was for trade shows, sales calls, or going on vacation. Every January, we would drive from northern Indiana to Atlanta for several days for our big industry trade show. After it was over, we would drive home for a week, and then turn around and drive to Orlando for a week’s vacation.

I know other families who will vacation with friends, renting a couple cabins for a week or spending a long weekend in a new city. It can be a lot of fun for everyone involved, but if you don’t plan it right, you can run into a few problems.

If you’re going to travel with friends or family, here are a few tips you need to consider.

1. Make sure you’re compatible.

Travel with friends can be fun, if you can agree on the what, where, and when. This is a group of people around a campfire at the beach.This is tough if you and your friends can’t even make it through a dinner together without someone getting irritated (even if you’re good at hiding it). If you can’t manage that, what makes you think you’re going to last an entire weekend?

Make sure you all enjoy the same things. If someone prefers museums and symphonies, while someone else prefers rock concerts and dive bars, there will always be one unhappy person on the trip. So make sure you know what your friends like before you commit to the trip.

2. Decide your itinerary early.

While I love just rolling into a new city and seeing what I can discover, that’s not everyone’s cup of tea. Some people are planners and prefer to know what they’re doing every minute.

Plan an itinerary where everyone gets something they want. Let each person pick a day or pick an activity, even if everyone else is not as enthusiastic about it. One friend may want to spend a day in a museum, even while someone else wants to go to a ballgame. Do both, and let each person introduce their friends to something they love.

Decide when you’re going to start the day. Some people prefer to sleep in until 9 and keep the party going late into the night. Others are up at 4:30 AM and ready to go by 5:00. Do not travel with those people. They’ll do terrible and awful things, like expect you to be ready to go at 5 AM too.

3. You don’t have to do EVERYTHING together

If you’re going to be gone for several days, be sure to give everyone some time to themselves. Take an afternoon and split up. If some people want to go shopping while someone else wants to go for a hike or sit by the pool, that’s fine. Not everything has to be an organized excursion.

If you’re traveling together as couples, then split up into different pairs and groups. For example, husbands and wives can pair off and do their own thing, or you can organize by activity: anyone who wants to go shopping can go shopping, anyone who wants to take a walking tour can do that. Don’t pair off by family or by gender, go by activity preference. If you’re traveling with several people, it can make for an interesting dynamic and let people get to know each other better.

4. Discuss any allergies, dietary restrictions, and medical issues in advance

Don’t pry into someone’s personal issues or health, but you should at least be aware if someone has a food allergy that might cause an issue for them. Whenever I travel with someone, I usually ask if they have a food allergy. If they say yes, I ask if it’s something they need an Epi-Pen for, but beyond that, I don’t pry.

Similarly, if you have a friend who can’t, won’t, or shouldn’t eat certain foods — vegetarians, religious restrictions, dietary preferences, food sensitivities — make sure you know that in advance so you can plan your meals accordingly.

5. Decide how you’re going to split expenses.

Most places are able to split everything out between couples and friends — restaurants, show tickets, hotel rooms and so on are all easily divided among groups. It’s the other stuff, like renting a big house, buying groceries, and paying for group excursions that can be a little tricky.

Work it all out beforehand, try to pay for as much in advance as you can, and collect the money. Use an app like Venmo or PayPal to transfer money immediately, and commit to paying each other right away. Consider putting some money in a pool for the group to pay for things like gratuities or drinks for the last evening.

Finally, make sure everyone can actually afford to go on the vacation you’re planning. Don’t book a luxury vacation and invite people who are on a Motel 6 budget. It will only create resentment and could cause some financial hardship if someone is trying to keep up and spend beyond their means.

Traveling with family and friends can be a lot of fun, if you invite the right people and do something you can all agree on. Start small with a day trip or even a weekend getaway. Figure out your compatibility with low-risk trips before you book that four-week European vacation.

Would you travel with friends or family? Is it something you’ve done, or something you wouldn’t wish on your worst enemy? Share your memories (and horror stories) with us on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: PXHere.com (Creative Commons 0)

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