Go Device-Free On Your Next Vacation

September 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Living down in Orlando, Florida means we see a lot of tourists. A LOT of tourists. And I’ve noticed that, wherever we go, especially to Disney World, people still spend a lot of time staring at their phone and missing out on the fun and joy of the most magical place on Earth!

Parents and kids alike, when they stop for lunch, will spend several minutes swiping, swiping, swiping at their phones, looking at whatever they think is more important than the trip that’s no doubt costing them a few thousand dollars, and they traveled hundreds of miles to get to.

(Of course, you need something to do while waiting in line, so I can’t blame anyone for being bored for a 90-minute wait for Tower Of Terror.)

I’m sure many people are just documenting their times, sharing photos to Instagram and Facebook, telling all their friends what a wonderful time they’re having.

But I want to issue a challenge: The next time you go on vacation, avoid using your phone for as long as you can.

A giant cell phone at the Disney World Pop Century Resort - A great place to try to go device-free for vacation

A giant cell phone at the Disney World Pop Century Resort

Set a No Phones rule for a day or two, and see how it goes. No social media, no texting friends, no checking email, and no pictures (kind of; more on that in a minute). No one can look at their phone for the entire day. And if you really want to commit to it, leave your phones in the hotel.

That doesn’t mean the entire family should be without a phone. At least one adult should carry a phone for emergencies. (And if you really wanted to avoid temptation, get a pay-as-you-go phone only for that purpose.)

Of course, you may want your kids to carry their phones in case they get separated and you need to get in touch with them. Instead, ask them to delete their social media apps (they can easily be downloaded later), and tell them no texting. Have them put their phone in airplane mode, and they won’t be able to receive texts or phone calls from friends.

Make it a challenge. See who can go without checking their phone the longest. I’ve heard of some people who, when they go to lunch together, will stack their phones on the table. The first one to break down and check theirs has to buy lunch for everyone. That includes answering phone calls or responding to the sweet siren song of the text notification.

Sweeten the pot a little bit. Everyone can carry their phone, but the first person to check theirs for any reason (other than checking reservations) has to do a family chore at the end of the day. Or anyone who checks their phone has to put some money into the family kitty, and that’s used to help pay for dinner on the last night out. (And no checking phones during bathroom breaks!)

If you need to take photos, you can carry an inexpensive digital camera (you can get them for less than $100), and just upload the photos when you get back to your hotel that night (assuming you brought a laptop) or when you get back home. Or, if phones are in airplane mode, they can still take pictures.

Finally, there is a question of personal security you should consider. It’s not a good idea to share vacation photos on social media while you’re actually on vacation. You’re essentially telling everyone that you’re not at home, which means your stuff could be stolen while you’re away. So even if you don’t take the no-phone challenge, at least consider refraining from posting vacation photos until you get home.

What are your family rules about mobile phones on vacation? How do you encourage face-to-face communication on vacation? Share your ideas and stories on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Jared (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 2.0)

How Waze and Google Maps Work on Your Phone

August 31, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

It was May 2016, and I was on my way to Indianapolis, driving from Orlando. As I was nearing Atlanta, my phone beeped frantically. It was my GPS app, Waze, telling me to exit in a half mile.

I had learned from experience to always follow Waze, so I got over and exited onto some county highway just in time. As I exited, I saw cars stopping on the highway, backing up almost to the exit, the line stretching up as far as I could see

I followed the new directions, driving along county roads east of Atlanta. It took 30 minutes, and Waze finally deposited me back onto the highway, 10 miles north of where I had exited, back into the traffic jam I had left. I was back in the same line of traffic, but only for one mile, and I was only stuck in it for 20 minutes.
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Five Family Travel Gadgets to Get Before Your Next Trip

May 27, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Thanks to technology, there are all new kinds of travel gadgets you can use to make your life easier on your next vacation. But this article isn’t yet another regurgitation of the same old “get a cheap tablet” advice. We all know those:

Erik Decker's EasyACC Battery Pack and iPad, one of his most important travel gadgets

My EasyACC Battery Pack and iPad. Note the awesome Tpro Bold 2 backpack in the background!

  • A cheap tablet that uses wifi only.
  • A portable DVD player for backseat video viewing.
  • Better yet, a small laptop for DVD viewing; it can double as your travel laptop at the hotel.

Those are all great gadgets, and I highly recommend them. But there are are a few gadgets that you may not have considered. At the very least, they’ll make life easier, and maybe even save you some money.
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Things to Do With Kids on a Plane

May 20, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Adults are pretty easy to entertain when we fly. We can read, watch TV or movies on our iPad, or play Words With Friends with our cousin in Spokane. Most adults have it pretty easy because we’re mature, we’re patient, and we don’t rely on others to entertain us for hours.

Flying with kids is a whole different ballgame.

Flying with kids is a whole different sport.

Kids on a planeIf you thought car travel was bad, taking kids on a plane trip can be much, much worse. That’s because the people in the car next to you don’t give you dirty looks or think you’re the Worst Humans On Earth because your child gets a little grumpy two hours into a five hour flight.

So how can you keep your kids entertained while they’re on the flight?
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Eight Ways to Prolong Your Mobile Phone Battery Life

April 8, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

After last month’s news about how closing dormant apps don’t help your mobile phone battery life, that got me to thinking about how to actually extend a phone’s battery, especially during a long day out.

Atlantic Unite's USB Port to charge your mobile phone battery

Atlantic Unite2’s USB Port

Now that we live in Orlando, my family and I often spend a good 8 – 10 hours wandering around one of the theme parks, and my mobile phone battery is usually nearly dead by the end of the day. Of course, it doesn’t help that I play Ingress (an augmented reality geolocation game played on your phone), but there are some things I do to try to extend my battery life throughout the day.

1. Reboot your phone

Do this the night before, while it’s plugged in. This way, you’ve closed any memory and processing leaks that might use extra power. Don’t forget to keep your apps updated, because new versions are sometimes less of a power drain than their older predecessors.
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How the Unite2 Collection Can Solve Cell Phone Battery Woes (and Other Travel Problems)

March 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

As someone who often travels for work, or is at least away from the office for an entire day, having a fully charged iPhone is important. Unfortunately, I don’t always manage my phone use properly, and am usually near the end of the battery life before I get back home.

Atlantic Unite2's USB Port

Atlantic Unite2’s USB Port

I read a recent article on ABC News about preserving battery life, and was surprised to learn that closing multitasking apps may actually use more battery than letting them run.

Apple says that leaving apps running doesn’t actually consume any more battery, because “Apps that are in a suspended state aren’t actively in use, open, or taking up system resources.” In other words, closing apps doesn’t help battery life.

But, Dave Burke, a vice president of engineering at Android, says that closing them may actually use more battery power. According to ABC and Burke, “closing all those apps actually activates them momentarily and may consume more battery than leaving them open in the background.”
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