Things to Pack and Avoid for a Full Day at the Theme Parks

February 14, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

As a veteran of the Orlando-based theme parks, I’ve seen it all. Families who plan for every contingency, and shove it all into a backpack whose size and weight would make a soldier nod quietly in appreciation.

People who come in so woefully unprepared that they spend $50 – $100 just to satisfy some small-but-nagging need they didn’t plan on, like a sweatshirt on a chilly day.

And people who know how to pack and plan for an entire 15 hour day, bringing the things they need and avoiding the things they don’t.

Here are a few things you should pack and not pack if you’re going to spend an entire day at Disney, Universal, Sea World, King’s Island, Six Flags, or any of the many theme parks dotting the country.

Things to Bring

A U.S. Marine with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) straps on a backpack while laying back on the pack, then rolling to one side and raising up from all fours. If you have to do this to pack for a day in the theme parks, you're taking too much.

A U.S. Marine with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) straps on a backpack while laying back on the pack, then rolling to one side and raising up from all fours.

  • Sun protection (sunscreen, sunglasses, and hats): It doesn’t matter what time of year you’re in the parks, or even if it’s a cloudy day, you can still get a sunburn. So take some sun protection, especially sweat-proof sunscreen, and use it regularly. Wear the hat and sunglasses to avoid getting a burn on your face and to protect your eyes.
  • Snack foods: Even if it’s just for a quick burst of energy or to tie you over when your kids are hungry two hours before dinner, take some granola bars or other individually-wrapped snack items. I personally like Clif bars, because they’re dense and filling despite their size. I used a few of these on my recent #DisneyParksChallenge.
  • Rain ponchos: If you come to Central Florida in the summer, it’s almost certainly going to rain in the afternoon. Buy some cheap ponchos at a Walmart and stuff them in your bag and wear them as needed. Pitch them at the end of your trip, because you’re not going to get them folded that small again. Hint: A lot of theme parks clear out when the rains come, so don’t leave when it gets rainy. Summer rains here last no more than an hour, but the parks will be a little emptier. Make lunch reservations for 1:30 or 2:00 because that’s when it usually starts.
  • Battery pack: For some reason, cell phones burn through their batteries more at the theme parks. (You can slow it down if you shut off Bluetooth and wifi.) But that may not be enough, so it helps to have some kind of battery backup. Whether it’s a 20,000mAH battery pack or one of those credit card-sized one-off chargers, you’ll need something to juice up and get you through the rest of the day.
  • Cell phone charger
  • This one is optional, but very helpful. Stuff a 3′ charging cord and cube into your bag just in case you find an electrical outlet during a rest break. Some restaurants have them tucked away in the corners, and you can occasionally find a plug in a bathroom. Even 10 minutes in a plug can buy you an hour of power. And if the universe is smiling on you, you’ll find an empty plug when you sit down for your lunch or dinner break.

Things to Avoid

  • A stroller: Unless you’ve got one of those all-terrain strollers with dual shocks and a portable generator, don’t bring a stroller with you. You can rent them inside every park everywhere, so there’s no point wrestling with one on the trip down and back.
  • Extra clothes: Unless you know for sure that you’re going to get cold, don’t take extra clothes “just in case,” or a change of clothes for a messy toddler. Similarly, if the morning is cold, but the day will warm up, try to tough out the cold temps rather than carrying around a sweatshirt or jacket all day. Keep in mind that we crank the AC up pretty high here in the summer and you can get cold if you spend a lot of time indoors. So if you get cold easily, take the sweater. Otherwise, don’t plan on every contingency. Check the weather before you go and pack accordingly.
  • Three days’ worth of diapers: You’re only going to the park for a single day. That requires at most six diapers. Don’t fill up your bag with the whole week’s worth of diapers. Just take what you’ll need each day. And put some wipes in a Ziploc bag, rather than taking the entire package. A lot of new parents pack up their kid’s entire changing table for day trips, and end the day with a bag that’s just as full as when they started.
  • Big bottles of water: Yes, you’re going to get thirsty. Yes, you need to stay hydrated. And yes, park water is expensive. But there are some parks that will give you water for free. You can get ice water when you sit down for lunch and dinner. And you can fill up your water bottle in a bathroom sink or special water bottle refill station. So there’s no need to bring a 1.5-liter bottle of water with you into the park. That’s 2.2 pounds of extra weight you’re carrying. Bring a smaller bottle and refill it as needed.

There are other things that are optional, but I tend not to carry just because of the weight, like a camera (my phone takes great pictures) or a guidebook (you can download an e-version on your Kindle app).

If you’re not sure of whether you should take something, think of the worst case scenario if you don’t have it, and decide whether you can live with that. Forgetting diapers for your 1-year-old can be a disaster, but leaving your guidebook behind won’t ruin your day.

What are your must-pack and must-avoid items on your theme park days? What do you absolutely need to have? Share your suggestions on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Luggage Buying Guide for Teenagers

November 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

When you travel with children, you long for the day that they’re old enough to have their own luggage and carry it or pull it behind them. When my kids were 4 or 5, we got them their own suitcase, complete with favorite cartoon character on it. It didn’t hold much, although we could fit a week’s worth of clothes into the tiny bag, and they could pull it behind them.

Now that they’re older, they’re responsible for packing their own suitcases when we travel. The only problem is, my 14-year-old son doesn’t want to be seen with a Thomas the Tank Engine suitcase anymore. Ditto for my daughters and their Hello Kitty bags.

The Atlantic Ultra Hardside luggage collection

The Atlantic Ultra Hardside luggage collection

When they were old enough, they wanted new suitcases to reflect their individuality and personal style. But as their father the travel writer, I got them bags that were functional and practical instead, without all the screened print designs. Here was my reasoning.

1. Your luggage will last for years. Your personal style will change.

I got my first suitcase when I was 27, and I carried it on flights for about 15 years. Then I got my first Travelpro bag and I was a convert. It was so much lighter and roomier. And because I took good care of it, I’m still carting it around with me.
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