How to Survive the Summer Heat on Vacation

June 29, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Living down in sunny Florida has given me a whole new appreciation for “hot summers.” Growing up in Indiana, we had plenty of hot weather, but the weather people would start to freak out if we had more than two weeks of 90+ degree temperatures.

Here in Central Florida, we started getting 90+ degree weather in May, and it won’t go away until September, which makes me realize Indiana doesn’t know how good they have it.

But life goes on, and people still come down here for summer vacation, as well as go to other hotspots like Texas, Arizona, and South Carolina. Even Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and northern Minnesota can hit 90+ degrees for a few weeks in the summer. And this week, Phoenix is facing a week of 120+ degree days.

So unless you want to travel up to the Canadian Northern Territories this summer, you’re going to have to deal with some heat wherever you go. Some people may be miserable, other people will enjoy it, but you should know how to get through it safely, and with a minimum of discomfort. Here are a few recommendations to surviving a blazing hot summer vacation.

1. Treat the summer like winter

Summer Heat Ayia Napa Sunset Cyprus Sun

Winter in the north is simple: never go outside when you don’t need to. We would dart from the house to the car, the car to the store/office/restaurant. I even found I could live without a giant parka if I did this.

It’s the same in Florida in the summer: limit your time outside whenever possible, and keep the distance between you and air conditioning to a minimum. If you’re going to be outside, then prepare accordingly. Do outdoor activities in the early morning or evening. Spend the middle of the day in museums, at a spa, or at restaurants. If possible, plan an indoor activity right after an outdoor activity. (Trust me, nothing on earth feels better than stepping into an air conditioned room after you’ve spent a couple hours outside.)

2. Wear light protective clothing that wicks sweat

If you’re going to theme parks, the beach, or spending the day outside at a family reunion, you’re going to get hot and sweaty. But you can reduce some of the discomfort if you wear light-colored clothing to reflect some of the heat (or just, you know, don’t wear a black or navy blue t-shirt). Wear t-shirts and undergarments that will wick away sweat — you can find those kinds of clothes at most athletic apparel stores or places like Duluth Trading Company.

Do this for your socks as well. Whenever I’m going to be doing a lot of walking outside, I’ll wear a thin pair of nylon or rayon socks under a regular pair of cotton socks to help prevent blisters.

3. Wear a hat

A hat will protect you from the sun and keep sweat out of your eyes. The idea is to protect yourself from direct sunlight, so the wider the brim, the better (think about why cowboys wore cowboy hats and not, say, tiny porkpie hats or bowlers). Hats can also help prevent sunburn on your face and neck. A baseball cap doesn’t offer much protection, but it’s better than nothing.

Women can wear big floppy hats and look stylish, while I think men in those big floppy safari hats look a bit ridiculous. Still, that doesn’t stop my dad from wearing one, and he’s always talking about how it helps him survive the summer heat, so maybe there’s something to it.

4. Use water/sweat-resistant sunscreen

It’s not enough to just slap on some sunscreen and think you’re protected for the day. In about 30 minutes, you’re going to sweat it all off and not even realize it. So get some sweatproof/waterproof sunscreen and put it on any exposed skin.

Even if you’re wearing a hat, you’ll still be plenty exposed to the sun, so put it on your face and neck as well. Don’t forget, sunlight reflected off water — a pool, lake, or ocean — can burn you just like regular sunlight. I’ve sunburned my face while fishing (and wearing a hat) plenty of times to learn that lesson.

4. Drink plenty of water

Without getting into how much you should drink or whether other beverages are an appropriate substitute, make sure you drink plenty of water on outdoor days. Otherwise, you can get muscle cramps or. . . serious intestinal distress if you go too long without it.

Also, remember that you lose more liquid from your body than you realize, especially if you’re visiting a dry climate, like the desert, where you don’t feel like you sweat very much. I remember the first time I went to Reno, Nevada and was amazed to discover I didn’t sweat very much. Someone told me that was because my sweat was evaporating — I mean, someone responded to something I said. It wasn’t like a complete stranger came up to me and said “Welcome to Reno, where your sweat evaporates in the desert.” But it did mean I was losing more water than I realized, which could have been dangerous.

Soda, fruit juice, and even milk are suitable substitutes, at least when it comes to your immediate survival, but you really should drink water, because it replaces your sweat and electrolytes better than anything else on the market. Iced tea and coffee are diuretics though, which means you’ll lose more than you take in, so avoid those for fluid replacement.

5. Don’t scoff at car sun shades

I never used these in Indiana, and always thought they were a little wimpy. But when I got to Florida and tried them out, I was sold. Depending on where you go (or live) in the summer, you’ll want to have some kind of windshield screen in your car. Use it whenever possible. You’ll remember the first time you ever grab a white hot steering wheel.

Similarly, park in the shade whenever you can. And if that means the difference between paying to park in a garage versus parking on a surface lot for free, you might want to consider paying for the parking.

How do you beat the summer heat? Do you have any special tips or tricks you use to avoid overheating or turning into a whiny fuss, like me? Share them in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Megapixel.com (Creative Commons 0, Public Domain)

About 

Erik deckers is a travel writer, as well as a content marketer and book author. He is the co-author of Branding Yourself, No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine. Erik has been blogging since 1997, and has been a newspaper humor columnist for over 20 years

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